"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-25-2007, 09:29 AM   #11
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I never rinse, but again that is just personal preference. I have tried rinsing and have not noticed any difference. Neither did the people I was feeding.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2007, 09:46 AM   #12
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Straits of Juan de Fuca
Posts: 893
hmm, I sure can... as you say, personal preference, I'm guessing.
__________________

__________________
~~~~~~~~~~
an old cook, still learning new tricks!
cjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2007, 10:30 AM   #13
Sous Chef
 
PytnPlace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ohio
Posts: 801
Isn't brining awesome!! I do it all the time for pork chops and chicken breasts. What a difference! No more dried out meat!

For pork chops and pieces of chicken I brine for 1 to 2 hours (usually closer to 1 hour). I usually only use a quart of H20 for small pieces of meat. To the quart I add 1/4 cup kosher salt and 2 tablespoons sugar - brown or white. Sometimes I add seasonings to the brine but more often I do not as I like to add seasonings or rubs before I bake or grill the meat.

BTW, I rinse and pat dry the meat after brining.
__________________
PytnPlace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2007, 10:34 AM   #14
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Yep. Better to start with the basics first.

I actually omit the sugar from my brine. I do not find it adds anything that I enjoy. There are others who agree with me and also others who would not dream of making a brine without some sort of sugar. That is the great thing about cooking. We can all do what we enjoy and there is no right or wrong answer.

Now that you have discovered brining you will use this technique a lot I am sure. Those that love it really love it!
now that you metioned sugar i actually think that i will omit it in the future as well. i don't like sugar much on my food and i could just get a taste of it on my pork chops making it a bit hammy. i only included it cos recipe said it would balance the salt and bring out the savory part of the meat instead of just the saltiness. nest time i would half the sugar and if i still don't like it omit it altogether.


i would be brining chicken breasts today. my brine would be 1 Tbsp of table salt ( don't have kosher) to a liter of water. i work this out roughly using the 1/2 cup salt to 1 gallon water. i plan to brine for 2 hours. hope this turn out nice and less salty than my pork. wish me luck
__________________
g23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2007, 10:36 AM   #15
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Candocook
Did you rinse before cooking?
I am not a fan of brining except for shrimp--30 minutes for previously frozen shrimp really makes them succulent and "fresh".

yes rinse and pat dry
__________________
g23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2007, 11:10 AM   #16
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 01:43 PM   #17
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
In my opinion there is a definite answer to this question.

You brined the chops for far too long. I looked up a number of recipes, including this one, by Alton Brown which is foolproof and almost all of them called for brining pork chops for 2 hours. I found a few 4 hours and one 6 hours but the standard seems to be 2 hours.

Cooks Illustrated (? I am pretty sure) ran some experiments and determined that using less salt renders poor results. They actually tell you to use twice as much salt and brine for half as much time, if a "quick" brine is necessary.

I suggest you leave the salt amount alone, half the sugar (IMO it's really a detectable flavor enhancer) and brine for 2 hours.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 01:58 PM   #18
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
In my opinion there is a definite answer to this question.

You brined the chops for far too long. I looked up a number of recipes, including this one, by Alton Brown which is foolproof and almost all of them called for brining pork chops for 2 hours. I found a few 4 hours and one 6 hours but the standard seems to be 2 hours.

Cooks Illustrated (? I am pretty sure) ran some experiments and determined that using less salt renders poor results. They actually tell you to use twice as much salt and brine for half as much time, if a "quick" brine is necessary.

I suggest you leave the salt amount alone, half the sugar (IMO it's really a detectable flavor enhancer) and brine for 2 hours.
i would have to agree with you on the less salt renders poor results!. read something similar somewhere but couldn't be sure but i just finished my experiment with my chicken breasts last night by halving my salt and brined for 2 hours, no difference. from now on i will stick to the 1 cup to 1 gallon rule or more and adjust the time instead.
__________________
g23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 02:28 PM   #19
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,404
I do not know why whould anybody brine pork chops. Pork is such a tender meat. All it needs proper time for cooking.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 02:44 PM   #20
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
I do not know why whould anybody brine pork chops. Pork is such a tender meat. All it needs proper time for cooking.

not the pork chops i have. i know it's also partly cos i overcook them as dh won't eat them otherwise but when i brined them i can over cook them so it looks right for dh but still remains moist and juicy for me. i used to dislike making pork chops but now i'm actually enjoying it


and there is a big difference between brined and unbrined pork chops whether it's overcooked or not.
__________________

__________________
g23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.