"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-26-2007, 02:19 PM   #1
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 75
Cutting with the grain or against the grain?

I know that you cut against the grain with beef but what about the other meats?

Chicken
Pork
Turkey
Lamb

i read that you cut chicken with the grain.

what are your thoughts on this?

__________________

__________________
g23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 02:23 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Just left of Europe and down a bit.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
Beef always across the grain.
same with pork and lamb.
Chicken doesn`t make too much difference.
but more than anything it ALL depends on what you want to do with it...

you don`t even state Raw or Cooked?
__________________

__________________
So long and Thanks for all the Fish ;)

YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 02:35 PM   #3
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095
Beef always across the grain.
same with pork and lamb.
Chicken doesn`t make too much difference.
but more than anything it ALL depends on what you want to do with it...

you don`t even state Raw or Cooked?

does it matter whether it's raw or cooked?


i basically want to cut them up for stir fries

and also if i've cooked a roast or something with these meats how do i cut them?
__________________
g23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 02:40 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Just left of Europe and down a bit.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
for stir frys then across and Thinly for red meats.
Chicken isn`t so bad as it`s usualy done 1`st and in cubes rather than slices.

yes it does matter if it`s Raw or cooked, Very Much so, as does the cooking method, across may be good for one meat in one dish, but across in another dish it may vanish into nothing at all.
__________________
So long and Thanks for all the Fish ;)

YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 02:55 PM   #5
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 75
i usually cut chicken in strips for stir fries as well as beef and pork and lamb in no particular fashion. but of late i'm very into tender meat and want to maximize on it by making sure i'm cutting it right before i do anything with it.

it's an assumption that when you cut against the grain you're cutting and breaking the connetive tissue thus making the meat seem more tender.
__________________
g23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 03:03 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Just left of Europe and down a bit.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
well connective tissue generaly runs with the grain yes, and so by cutting across it you minimise the amount per mouthfull and also give greater surface area for cooking through.

chicken`s cool in strips definately, cubed is great too, it doesn`t really matter so much at all, red meats (tougher) it does matter.
__________________
So long and Thanks for all the Fish ;)

YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 03:22 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Half Baked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,927
If you freeze the meat for a bit, you can slice it much more thinly...this hint has helped me.
__________________
Jan
Please spay and neuter your pets. The Animal Rescue Site
Half Baked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2007, 03:27 PM   #8
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
You do not have to always cut beef across the "grain". With tender cuts like sirloin or tenderloin, you can cut it as you wish and the meat will be tender to the tooth. Cuts such as flank, and various cuts from the round need to be cut across the grain of the meat fibers for "tenderness". Other meats don't require it.
__________________

__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]