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Old 12-22-2004, 03:11 PM   #11
 
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Similar but far from the same in someof the bones and muscle masses...

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Old 12-22-2004, 03:28 PM   #12
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If anyone can direct me to a web site that has DIAGRAMS OR PICTURES of the deboning process, I would be appreciative. I have been able to find verbal descriptions of the process. I have been able to find diagrams and pictures of butterflying and cutting the chicken into pieces, but not deboning.
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Old 12-22-2004, 04:37 PM   #13
 
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Otter, if you google "turducken", I'm sure you will find the full procedure in vast detail....I forgot to save the page...

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Old 12-22-2004, 06:32 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifter
Otter, if you google "turducken", I'm sure you will find the full procedure in vast detail....I forgot to save the page...

Lifter
No such luck, at least on the first page. Maybe I should email John Madden - it's obvious that he has eaten a few! I watched the show and didn't pay a whole lot of attention. Afterwords, I thought it was a great idea, and I remember the basics, the breast bone and the back bone, but am fuzzy after that.
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Old 12-22-2004, 08:40 PM   #15
 
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Otter, a quick search didn't give me photo's but the page at


www.chefpaul.com/turducken.html

is both an interesting site to visit, and has a written explanation of the boning process, some good "after the boning" snaps, etc, that might be of use to you.

Sorry, I should have given you an extra key word for your web search...

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Old 12-23-2004, 09:32 AM   #16
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Wow, that is some process! Don't think I'd want to go to all that work, but wouldn't mind taste-testing it.
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Old 12-27-2004, 11:59 PM   #17
 
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Otter, I'm hoping you will still give this a try!

The "bafflegab" descriptions are not that "hard" to do...(if I can do it, its "idiot-proof!")...

Like I've said before, its down to a really good knife...the "first time" I did this with a chicken I used my re-sharpened Normark filleting knife, that I bought in or around 1973, and keep keen with the Arkansas whetstones and mineral oil...but the Trident boning knife is such a jewel, as long as you keep it up on a sharpening steel...

Anyways, the "trick" is to get your bird sort of "reasonably warm" that the muscles and joints are reasonably "easy" to "wiggle"...

Turn it breast side down, and "skillfully" locate and pull up those "shoulder 'scapular' bones" out first...and only then start down the backbone, taking good care with the "oyster" bits...

Your first "issue" will be the thigh socket bone joints, but "slashing away with the sharpened knife tip" will teach you how to get past that...and it quickly separates...the muscles (meat) are sort of tied back to the carcass, and you can just press your knife blade down the inside of the thigh, and cut out the bone...likewise with the drumstick, remembering to sever the sinews at either end...the bones come out pretty easy...

After that, the breast meat is very simple...there's only a couple "attachment points", just keep the skin intact...

"Chop" the wings between the "drumlet" and the "wrist", using the "wrist" and "tip" with a chef's knife, and use the "discarded" pieces (all of them!) for "stock"...

The "drumlet" and "clavicle" are indeed a bit of a "project" to "dig out" (especially considering the duck's peculiar bones and meat!), but there's no big threat to humanity if you leave these "in", is there? (I doubt the "western World", as we have come to know it, will crash in the fashion of Ozymandius, if there is a bone or two there, and we are forewarned!)

Rubbing, marinading, and the various methods of cooking this up...I gotta let you try it! Don't "chicken out"!

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Old 12-28-2004, 09:07 AM   #18
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I'm going to give it a try in mid to late January. I'm sure I can get the bones out, but am concerned about how presentable the duck will look after the process. I ordered a new Forschner boning knife to aid in the process.
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Old 12-29-2004, 07:08 AM   #19
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Otter, go to www.foodtv.com and click on 'videos'; you'll see a section for 'poultry'; click on that, and there's a video you can watch for deboning a chicken.

Also, for everyone, they have a lot of neat basic videos on things like knife skills, etc. Pretty cool.
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Old 12-29-2004, 08:35 AM   #20
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Thanks marmalady! I didn't know that area existed. Lots of really interesting stuff there, so will also go back to check some other things.
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