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Old 08-29-2006, 03:57 AM   #11
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Yeah, you can use Olive Oil for frying perfectly, no need to go for the Extra Virgine, but it will give you an exquisite flavour just as well. The only reason it is so rarely used is, of course, the cost.
I must check out this sansa that clive mentioned... I am sure it can be found here and cost much less!!
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Old 08-29-2006, 05:34 AM   #12
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If I understand rightly, sansa oil is the same as aceite de orujo here in Spain. This is oil produced from the olive leftovers and involves the use of solvents as well as mechanical processing methods. There was quite a bit of hoo-ha a few years ago here in Spain over the safety of the solvents, a surprise since Spain is usually quite relaxed about such things. I would prefer to use refined oil rather than orujo oil, I think.
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Old 08-29-2006, 06:50 AM   #13
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Back when my mother-in-law was a bit more spry, we used to get liters and liters of it every autumn from her, free, from "the family trees." It was a major fall tradition for my in-laws to hop over to the island for a couple of weeks to "do the olives."

Thus, we fried our potatoes in it all those years and they were delish, without a doubt. However, those years are now well in the past and we have to buy it like mere mortals. And it's expensive over here too, I assure you.

Consequently, we now fry potatoes in corn oil and while it may be that I've forgotten how good they were in olive oil, we're more than satisfied. I think most important is the double-frying technique Andy spelled out so well. That and the right type of potatoes (we don't really have much choice at any given time, but certainly some varieties fry better than others).

Frying oil keeps for a fair number of frying sessions and then it starts to smell like the back of a cheap restaurant. Then it's time to go!
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Old 08-29-2006, 06:52 AM   #14
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Have never tried deep frying in olive oil - have to give it a try.

Snoop, canola oil is a product that originated in Canada and is a cultivar of rapeseed oil which you might be able to find in Spain.

Not recommending it cause have never tried it.
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Old 08-29-2006, 10:47 AM   #15
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Thanks Ayrton and auntdot. I've never seen rapeseed oil here in Spain, either. Fields of it in France, mind. I guess that because olive trees are ubiquitous here, that's what they use. The only other oils you can buy here in the supermarkets are sunflower oil and corn oil. Peanut oil is sold here pretty much like sesame seed oil - in very small bottles at surprisingly high prices.

Glad to hear all these opinions. I'll definitely give it a try.
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Old 09-23-2006, 10:54 PM   #16
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expensive!! i never deep fry (as in pour an entire bottle) with olive oil, just canola or light extra virgin, pure olive oil seems to thick for me. However if I were to fry on a shallow pan I would use olive oil for my fries but they dont tend to work well since the potatoes absorbs the oil, so i have to keep adding after every batch.
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Old 09-24-2006, 12:55 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snoop Puss
If I understand rightly, sansa oil is the same as aceite de orujo here in Spain. This is oil produced from the olive leftovers and involves the use of solvents as well as mechanical processing methods. There was quite a bit of hoo-ha a few years ago here in Spain over the safety of the solvents, a surprise since Spain is usually quite relaxed about such things. I would prefer to use refined oil rather than orujo oil, I think.
thats exactly what "olio di sansa di oliva" is... when the olive has no more oil to give, then there are chemicals added to the olive mash that encourage it to release more oil - go figure... i have used it for frying and it works well as a frying oil but in no way will you get the taste we are all after, this oil is practically depleted of the taste we know of as "olive oil" - yes, it is more cost effective, but if we are looking for taste, go with a pure olive oil and try not to raise it past 375 so it will last longer... mario batali practically swears by evoo in all of his frying - expensive, but he says it is well worth it
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Old 09-24-2006, 01:00 AM   #18
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i have found that blanching the fries in boiling water instead of blaching in oil on the first go around works well... that is, after cutting the fries and rinsing in cold water to remove the surface starch, i drop them in boiling water until tender, then i proceed to finish crisping them up in 375 F oil til golden
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Old 09-24-2006, 06:02 AM   #19
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Interesting, Seven S. I might give that a go. I've tried chips in olive oil a couple of times since posting and they are extremely good. Not as good as the ones I had in the restaurant though. Blanching might be a good way to go.
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Old 09-24-2006, 09:40 AM   #20
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I'll state that I can not remember the source but; I think one should be a bit concerned about the change in OO from monounsaturated fats to transfatty acids that occur at temperatures above 360 degrees F.

I'll try to find that source today and modify this post. Of course, the cost may alone stop that problem.

edit: according to the olive source the above is Bunk. The myth is based on an interpretation of how oleo is made industrially and has no meaning in a home kitchen.
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