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Old 08-07-2006, 02:26 PM   #11
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The flame is often just a tableside show, and an effective one. I agree with Ironchef...I often cook with brandy and prefer to reduce, so I rarely flame.
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Old 08-07-2006, 02:42 PM   #12
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Hmm..

Never realized there was a flavor difference involved. It would seem to me that the only thing burning off when you "light up" is (more or less) the evaporated alcohol - which is already in a gaseous state (and out of the dish). I wouldn't have ever thought it would impact the flavor. Guess it's just one of those things. Good to know!

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Old 08-07-2006, 02:46 PM   #13
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Well you are right ronjohn, it is the vapors that are burning which are not in the dish anyway, but (and someone please correct me if I am wrong because I was never really told this was true) the heat from those flames is cooking the booze a bit which is what changes the flavor somewhat.

I always thought that part of flaming a dish was for safety reasons. It was sort of like a preemptive strike. You flame it yourself so it does not flame unexpectedly while you are cooking.
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Old 08-07-2006, 10:07 PM   #14
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wow... what i thought may have been a stupid question has turned into an interesting discussion.

i need to do more research on this topic...
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Old 08-07-2006, 11:18 PM   #15
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Don't let them scare you, it's very unlikely you will need a fire extinguisher.

It sounds like your saying your recipe calls for flaming the cognac, then adding more cognac and reducing? That seems like an extra step you don't really need, the reducing is the important part.
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Old 08-08-2006, 01:16 AM   #16
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You've gotten good advice here - the only reason I wouldn't flambe something is because my microwave is so low to my stove - although...................I could use a new hood vent..................... and kitchen for that matter............ never mind, my husband's an insurance adjuster and wouldn't turn in the claim anyway
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Old 08-08-2006, 05:46 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbren
It sounds like your saying your recipe calls for flaming the cognac, then adding more cognac and reducing?
There is no final reduction after the 2nd addition of cognac. This sauce is finished with cognac and butter- a practice that I brought into question earlier. Butter is sublime for finishing sauces, but not cognac. At least not in my book.
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Old 08-08-2006, 07:07 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbren
Don't let them scare you, it's very unlikely you will need a fire extinguisher.

It sounds like your saying your recipe calls for flaming the cognac, then adding more cognac and reducing? That seems like an extra step you don't really need, the reducing is the important part.
the small amount of cognac added after the initial reduction is probably just to add just a touch of flavor and alcohol. it is optional... not required.
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Old 08-08-2006, 09:53 AM   #19
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lol, Kithcenelf now that you said that outloud, better not.

I use to make a greenpeppercorn and cognac sauce for steak all the time, reduced and mounted up with butter, very nice but a little sweet for my taste, the peppercorns helped to cut that. If your steak is pepper-crusted that will help to balance the sweet. You know, when I'm not sure about a recipe, I follow that directions to the letter the first time, then I know how I want to change it after that or if you really want to know the difference, have two pans, reduce only in one and flame only the other. If you do that, let us know what you think.
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Old 08-17-2006, 12:29 PM   #20
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Flambeing is great for tableside presentation with figs or bananas, but is not necessary. Most people that light the yak or other alcohol do it because they think it is cool, Personally, when i very first started cooking, I took a shot of liquor and dumped it into a hot empty pan because I thought it was just the coolest thing.....how retarded is that
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