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Old 11-12-2010, 05:59 AM   #11
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I have had great calamari until the last time I ordered it.

It was overcooked and was like chewing rubber bands. I sent it back, something I never do, but it was such as shame because I knew it could and should have been good.

It turned me off.
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Old 11-12-2010, 11:40 AM   #12
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I've caught my own squid with a fishing rod, gutted it, and tossed it for a few minutes in a campfire. So, yes, that one may not have been fair. Calamari can be very tender... i'm trying to find the right texture word for a great calamari... but, I'm also a fan of street carts that toast whole dried squid over a flame, a jerky.

"leathery"
chewing it makes your jaws ache
jerky
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Old 11-12-2010, 12:24 PM   #13
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Great idea for a thread. I watch a lot of Iron Chef and find myself relying on the food critics to describe to me how it is... sometimes they are good at it but other times I just want to slap the next person that says "It has a beautiful flavor."

I wanted to give "robust" a shot...

Robust - bold flavor, usually savory (not sweet) - raw onion

Any other input on "robust"?
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Old 11-13-2010, 12:12 AM   #14
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i've had robust wines that were nothing like onions.

man, this english adjective thing is a beetch.
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Old 11-16-2010, 11:50 PM   #15
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syrupy: very viscose liquid, that's mostly absent of large suspended particles such as fat or starch; it thins and liquifies in the mouth, either because of body heat or the addition of saliva. Examples are maple syrup, of course, but I also include even thicker honey (off hand, I can't think of a savory example).

What is a "gelatin, or gelatinous" texture? Jello, or a pad of cold butter?
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Old 11-17-2010, 03:54 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spork View Post
syrupy: very viscose liquid, that's mostly absent of large suspended particles such as fat or starch; it thins and liquifies in the mouth, either because of body heat or the addition of saliva. Examples are maple syrup, of course, but I also include even thicker honey (off hand, I can't think of a savory example).

What is a "gelatin, or gelatinous" texture? Jello, or a pad of cold butter?
I'd say Jello, of course, and aspic, but not cold butter.

Cold butter is firm, I guess.
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Old 11-17-2010, 10:10 AM   #17
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I'd say Jello, of course, and aspic, but not cold butter.

Cold butter is firm, I guess.
And so, what is the best word to describe the different texture of jellies/jams?
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Old 11-17-2010, 10:16 AM   #18
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i've had robust wines that were nothing like onions.

man, this english adjective thing is a beetch.
Yeah it sure is. It's odd that we can use a word appropriately in context but yet have a hell of a time actually defining it. The dictionary describes robust as rich and full-bodied, using coffee as an example, which is perfect. I guess that's good. Maybe onion has more of a sharp flavor.
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Old 11-17-2010, 06:12 PM   #19
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"mucilaginous" - slimy, mucus-like.
It's an interesting texture. Majority of people who encounter it are immediately repulsed. Humans have an ancient instinct that associates it with spoilage. But I kinda like it.

There's a Japanese yam, available in Asian markets, called yama-imo, that translates "mountain potato." When boiled like a potato, it tastes a lot like a potato, while retaining a hint of the crispness of a raw potato. But when grated raw... it magically develops the slimy, slippery, consistency and texture of (please excuse me) thick spit. Its taste is somewhat neutral, sort of like a raw potato.

"mucilaginous" is also represented by okra. I also think asparagus has just a little bit of this curious texture. I like both vegetables, too.
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Old 11-18-2010, 12:24 AM   #20
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snicker, sharp is good for onions. unless they're cooked to become sweet. but not sugary sweet. oh geez.

spork, i always think of mucillaginous as the coating around tomato seeds.

i've seen yama in asian markets here. i always thought it was just bad engrish spelling for a normal yam, lol. i'll have to check them out. thanks.
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