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Old 06-26-2007, 03:15 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
I "could" say that it's made from the parts of young calves chained inside tiny cages in order to prevent their moving around & thus turning their muscular/meat structure from snowy white to pink (thus reducing their price).

But I won't.
And boy oh boy is it delicious! Not quite as delicious as the livers of force-fed geese, but still very good. In fact, a nice piece of grilled chained-in-a-little-cage-baby-calf paired with a piece of seared-forced-fed-with-a-tube-goose-liver topped with Sauce Perigueux is out of this world. Hey, maybe I'll run that for a special!

But back to the original question, I agree with the Jedi that it's probably veal cooked sous vide. If it was with mushrooms, they would've called it Veau a la Champignon, Veau a la Cepes, etc.
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Old 06-26-2007, 04:05 PM   #12
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But back to the original question, I agree with the Jedi that it's probably veal cooked sous vide. If it was with mushrooms, they would've called it Veau a la Champignon, Veau a la Cepes, etc.
My only problem with that is what part of a calf needs to be cooked sous vide? stew meat? the shank? Veal cooked low and slow, other than the breast, makes no sense to me.
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Old 06-26-2007, 04:27 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by ChefJune
My only problem with that is what part of a calf needs to be cooked sous vide? stew meat? the shank? Veal cooked low and slow, other than the breast, makes no sense to me.
The shank would work, or veal shoulder and veal cheeks. Those are the three cuts that I've done sous vide. It should work for the other cuts of veal that are normally tougher as well. Usually, for proteins that I do sous vide, I take cuts of meat that I would normally braise. That's just my preference. But tender proteins can be done sous vide and be done very successfully. Things like salmon, tenderloin, foies gras etc.. With sous vide, for those who don't know, it's not only just about making a piece of meat tender, but what it also does is it concentrates the flavors with the vacuum sealing. If you're going for just tenderness, then something like a Ziploc bag can be used, but when you use a vacuum sealer/bags, whatever marinade that you use is "forced" into the protein and makes it more flavorful. Then, by gently cooking it via sous vide, you get this unbelievably tender and flavorful protein. If you were to do two proteins sous vide with the same marinade, then cooked one in a Ziploc bag and one with a vacuum sealed bag, you'd taste the difference. For me, I just prefer to use sous vide for things that I would braise or slow poach because for something like salmon, foie gras, etc., I like getting the golden brown crust on it. I know I could do that after I sous vide it, but I don't see the point of that. I may as well poach it in butter or olive oil. Although it can be done without one, a thermal circulator is a great, great tool to use for cooking sous vide because you can maintain a consistent low temperature. LOL the problem is that they cost in excess of $1,000 so it's not something most homecooks would buy.
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Old 06-26-2007, 05:44 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MommyDoThis
I am not sure I have the spelling correctly so please forgive me! I have relatives who are French and this is on the menu for today. They gave me the option to request "another" dish if I wasn't comfortable with this one.

I said, No that sounds good. Veal is good!

Then I noticed the hubby giggling at my response...

So my question is:

Does anyone know what Veal La Sous (sp?) is?

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veau elevé sous la mère describes a calf that has been allowed to be raised by it's mother, as opposed to the customary method described so eloquently by Breezy.
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