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Old 08-17-2006, 05:23 PM   #11
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Here's another comment on dry or "oil-less roux" from Chuck Taggart's "The Gumbo Pages":
Now, one not-so-bad idea is the oil-less roux, pioneered by Cajun Chef Enola Prudhomme. Basically, you just dump the flour into a cast-iron skillet and toast it dry, making sure to stir it around as you would a normal roux. I've never tried this, but apparently it works rather well, and is perfect for folks who are on low-fat diets.

Taggart also has a great discussion of regular rouxes, too, and I love his comment about making roux in the microwave: "Bah, humbug!"
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Old 08-17-2006, 05:58 PM   #12
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I use a combination of All Purpose and high protein unbrowned dry roux when I make bagels.

So is vegetable oil called wet roux?
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Old 08-17-2006, 06:16 PM   #13
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My cleaning woman gets all kinds of bargains at the Salvation Army Store, and the other day, she brought me a cookbook that she had found there...A Trim and Terrific Louisianna Kitchen, by Holly Berkowitz Clegg.
Holly uses browned flour instead of the traditional roux to lighten up a lot of the traditional recipes. She browns hers on a baking sheet in a 400 degree oven for 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. There is no additional fat added to the recipes.
I think the skillet would work better for me, as I wouldn't have to keep bending over to check the oven. And since I have Calphalon skillets, I'll use one of those.
I haven't tried one of the recipes yet...it's too hot right now, but I'll definately give it a shot next winter. I'm curious to know how the taste will compare to that of the traditional roux.
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Old 08-17-2006, 06:36 PM   #14
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How does the flavor compare between a roux made with roasted flour and oil vs a roux made with raw flour and oil cooked to the same color as the roasted flour roux?
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Old 08-17-2006, 07:09 PM   #15
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As I said, I don't make a lot of dishes with roux, so I can't really answer. It was good, but I think you'd have to make a side-by-side comparison to see just how much difference it makes. The dry roux I made was quite brown and added a nice flavor to the dish. I suspect the traditional way of making it would be better, but as I said, the dry roux is very convenient.
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Old 08-18-2006, 10:15 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
How does the flavor compare between a roux made with roasted flour and oil vs a roux made with raw flour and oil cooked to the same color as the roasted flour roux?
i'm from louisiana where almost everything we cook is started with a roux and the holy trinity (celery, bell pepper, and onion).

in the last few years, as my parents have gotten older, they've been trying to eat healthier, and my mom has resorted to using "dry roux" instead of her usual vegetable oil & flour roux. as a matter of fact, my dad is great at accomplishing what i call a "black roux," because he is VERY consistent at getting an oil-based roux as dark as possible without burning; this dark roux can add tremendous flavor to your dishes!

however, what we have all discovered is that a dry roux, when prepared correctly actually adds MORE flavor to your dishes... and i don't know why.

remember the post i made about my parents fighting... the reason why her crab stew tasted so much better and "different," was because of the dry roux (store bought) she added after sauteeing her vegetables.

in short... the BEST gumbo i've ever tasted was made with a dry roux. the BEST crab stew my mom has ever put together was made with a dry roux, so... there's my answer.

tonight, i'm making chicken fricasee using guess what? a dry roux.
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Old 08-18-2006, 10:21 AM   #17
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Thanks for the explanation BC. Does the dry roux provide a DIFFERENT flavor or a more intense flasvor, or what?
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Old 08-18-2006, 10:42 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Thanks for the explanation BC. Does the dry roux provide a DIFFERENT flavor or a more intense flasvor, or what?
it adds a different flavor; the ONLY way i can describe it is as follows... using the dry roux added a "nuttier & smoother" taste and it seemed to allow the other flavors to be accentuated.

the crab taste really, really came out, but you could also tell she did a good job sauteeing the onions, etc. because you could taste them as well. at the same time, the "gravy" was smoother.
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Old 08-18-2006, 04:23 PM   #19
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Could it be that the oil -- and especially butter -- might pick up a somewhat burned taste in the process of browning the flour? The heat is pretty high.
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Old 08-18-2006, 04:26 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by black chef
i'm from louisiana where almost everything we cook is started with a roux and the holy trinity (celery, bell pepper, and onion).... the BEST gumbo i've ever tasted was made with a dry roux. the BEST crab stew my mom has ever put together was made with a dry roux, so... there's my answer.
BC, I would love to have your recipe for these two dishes -- which I assume is similar to your mom's.

Pretty please?
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