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Old 01-17-2007, 01:35 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
I was out of town staying in a large city. I was not going to get my rental car for hours so I called a taxi. When it arrived, there was another passenger in the front seat. She and the cab driver were both smoking cigarettes and there was a lot of smoke in the car. I pushed the button and rolled down my window and leaned over and rolled down the opposite one too.

The lady in the front seat gave the driver a one dollar bill and asked him to roll up the windows and he did. Two blocks down the street and I rolled them back down. This time, she took a $20 bill out of her purse, rolled it up and showed it to the cab driver. So he rolled up the windows again.

A few blocks down the street, the cab driver pulled into a parking space and asked the woman for $15.65. She gave him sixteen dollars and left the cab.

Funny thing, my fare was $20 even.
How incredibly rude!!! She was a poor money manager, too. Sorry you had to endure such a nasty ride.
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Old 01-17-2007, 02:10 PM   #132
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I wouldn't get into can if somebody was smoking in it period.
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Old 01-17-2007, 02:27 PM   #133
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How very interesting!
I've just read this entire post from start to finish. How much has actually sunk in, I'm not sure.
I was brought up in England, Victorian style. Everyone sat down at the table together. No-one began eating until the others were served. No elbows, and definitely no hats ( hats are removed when entering a house of restaurant!)Fork in the left hand, knife in the right ( and NEVER held like a pencil). Use your fork upside down; NEVER shovel your peas on a fork ( I'm still very adept at balancing peas on the back of the fork!). Pass the salt, pass the pepper, pass the gravy, please. No talking whilst eating, much less with your mouth full. A little mouthful at a time, rather than stuffing your face. NEVER eat with your mouth open. Never make a noise whilst eating. If you have guests, wait for the guest to start before you do. Never push your plate away when you've finished. Do not leave the table unless you ask.

Any transgressors got a rap across the knuckles with the back of a spoon.
The most appalling example of bad manners, for me, is someone who picks food off your plate without being invited. Someone over here used to do that to me until I rapped HIM over the knuckles. Never did it again.

So why all the etiquette?
Eating is (and always should be) a pleasurable process. I, for one, don't find anything pleasurable about a slob spread halfway across the table talking with his mouthful and spitting food at others. Yuk!!
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Old 01-17-2007, 02:56 PM   #134
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Originally Posted by cliveb
How very interesting!
I've just read this entire post from start to finish. How much has actually sunk in, I'm not sure.
I was brought up in England, Victorian style. Everyone sat down at the table together. No-one began eating until the others were served. No elbows, and definitely no hats ( hats are removed when entering a house of restaurant!)Fork in the left hand, knife in the right ( and NEVER held like a pencil). Use your fork upside down; NEVER shovel your peas on a fork ( I'm still very adept at balancing peas on the back of the fork!). Pass the salt, pass the pepper, pass the gravy, please. No talking whilst eating, much less with your mouth full. A little mouthful at a time, rather than stuffing your face. NEVER eat with your mouth open. Never make a noise whilst eating. If you have guests, wait for the guest to start before you do. Never push your plate away when you've finished. Do not leave the table unless you ask.

Any transgressors got a rap across the knuckles with the back of a spoon.
The most appalling example of bad manners, for me, is someone who picks food off your plate without being invited. Someone over here used to do that to me until I rapped HIM over the knuckles. Never did it again.

So why all the etiquette?
Eating is (and always should be) a pleasurable process. I, for one, don't find anything pleasurable about a slob spread halfway across the table talking with his mouthful and spitting food at others. Yuk!!
Are you or anyone else familiar with what my etiquette-strict mother used to call the "boarding house reach"? I never knew whether she made it up or not, but it referred to reaching to grab something on the table instead of asking politely for it to be passed to you.
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:04 PM   #135
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzyQ3
Are you or anyone else familiar with what my etiquette-strict mother used to call the "boarding house reach"? I never knew whether she made it up or not, but it referred to reaching to grab something on the table instead of asking politely for it to be passed to you.
Yes, I've heard of it. I think it may have come about as a way to get your mealtime "due" before the other diners did, boarding house-style. Somehow I picture the same thing happening at the table of one of my aunt and uncle's house at mealtime. They had 11 children.
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:56 PM   #136
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Originally Posted by CharlieD
I wouldn't get into can if somebody was smoking in it period.
I'm sure you meant "car," unless we're back to discussing toilets.

What a very strange thread this is.
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Old 01-17-2007, 07:13 PM   #137
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oops, sory, yes, of course I ment "car". Thank you.
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Old 01-21-2007, 05:33 PM   #138
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Lulu, you're definitely on my guest list. What you said about manners and etiquette really struck a chord with me. The very first time I wound up having to sit at a head table I was just apalled. Yes, I was taught etiquette for just that reason -- my mom had been taught manners, but not necessarily formal etiquette and was apalled herself when she had to go to her first military formal. In this case I was going to a dining-out for West Point graduates and was very surprised to get there and find my name on the head table (my boyfriend was the youngest grad). All that wait and watch someone eat first goes down the drain -- THEY are waiting for YOU to eat first! To top it off, I didn't realize that at formal banquets you are never seated next to your spouse/date. For a good reason, it makes you socialize with strangers. But thanks to those Sundays of my childhood I made it through with only one minor faux pas. After dinner, I was chatting with the commanding general, drinking a glass of white wine (thank heaven for that). Someone joined us and I backed up a step to include him, forgetting that I was already backed up to the platform the head table was on. I fell backwards, pinwheeling my arms to keep from falling on my butt. The general went to grab me, and both of our drinks went flying. My finary was all borrowed (I didn't own a formal). Like I said, thank heaven he and I were both politely sipping WHITE wine, or both his mess dress and my borrowed velvet skirt and silk blouse would have been ruined. My clothes and his uniform lived to dance and dine again after a trip to the cleaners. Ironically, after hearing the tale, a high ranking civilian I worked for said his wife absolutely refused to go anywhere if she thought she had to sit at the head table. So I wound up doing it again a few times, as his "date" (strictly platonic, he just wanted someone who would not embarass him and could converse with strangers). p.s., General Kelly was vastly amused to learn I was a veteran and a feminist when my then-boyfriend was such a chauvinist.
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Old 06-21-2007, 11:55 PM   #139
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[quote=Nicholas Mosher]This is something that carries over into the way I choose to cook and present food. I like the food I serve to people to be ready for eating with either a fork, spoon, or chopsticks.

I really like this Nicholas. I think that when people are dining guests (unless they are very good, long time friends), they would appreciate not being served "difficult" foods and this avoid possible embarassment at not knowing how to eat it correctly or making a mess accidentally. Your approach seems very considerate of your guests by allowing them to fully enjoy the meal and the company. While I love to eat really messy foods, I prefer to eat them in my own home with only my family around to laugh at me!
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Old 06-23-2007, 01:38 AM   #140
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I only eat Kebabs from the stick (skewer) pick it up in the hands and enjoy, thats what us Aussies do anyway, that is what the good old BBQ is for, fingers and the occassional , knife,fork,spoon, then enjoy and lick the fingers later. Wash it down with a good Ale or drink of your choice.
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