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Old 07-25-2005, 04:28 PM   #11
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That has to be a mis-print, at 54 degrees you are closer to making ice cubes than
cooking anything.

Nick
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Old 07-25-2005, 04:56 PM   #12
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Perhaps that was celcius? I have forgotten how to convert to F. What would that work out to?
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Old 07-25-2005, 05:03 PM   #13
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Perhaps that was celcius? I have forgotten how to convert to F. What would that work out to?
You maybe right 54 degrees celcius is equal to 130 degrees
farenheit.

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Old 07-26-2005, 10:58 AM   #14
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Here is another post from someone using this method

I have done a lot of cooking sous-vide over the last several years. It is ideal for chicken breasts and most fish. A piece of fish or meat cooked sous-vide will be cooked to the same degree of doneness throughout. You can chill a chicken breast after cooking sous-vide and then crispen the skin before serving.

Food retains moisture and flavor and cannot overcook provided you retain the correct temperature. This last is the most difficult part. There is no crock-pot thatwill maintain a temperature of 140F. Professionals use a lab bath but these can run into
several hundred dollars. I use the super simmer burner on my Wolf range but, even with that, I
have to keep a thermometer with an alarm in the water to warn me if the temperature starts to
climb. 5F either way does not seem to be a problem although I prefer it to go lower rather than higher.

It is also a good idea to keep a thermometer in the food itself as an extrainsurance. One canput a small instant thermometer into the food prior to vacuuming, making sure that the dial
is visible through the plastic. Another solution is to sticK a small piece of weather stripping
over your Food-saver bag after sealing it. A thin probe can then be passed through weather
stripping into the food without destroying the vacuum
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Old 07-26-2005, 02:52 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Perhaps that was celcius? I have forgotten how to convert to F.
Double celsius and add 32 for an rough fahrenheit conversion.
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Old 07-26-2005, 02:58 PM   #16
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Thanks Caine. I know that formula, but I always forget if I am supposed to double it and add 32 or add 32 and then double it
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Old 07-26-2005, 03:42 PM   #17
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It seemed like maintaining water temp would be a pain when I first read this.

This may be a Sunday experiment when it is cooler and I am less busy ....
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Old 07-26-2005, 03:52 PM   #18
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I am thinking a candy/oil thermometer that attaches to the side of the pot would take
a lot of temp problems out of doing it.

Nick
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Old 07-26-2005, 03:57 PM   #19
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I am thinking a candy/oil thermometer that attaches to the side of the pot would take
a lot of temp problems out of doing it.

Nick
Candy/Oil ... What do they start at? Higher than 140, right?

I was thinking meat thermo ... mine starts at 32 and goes to well 300, i think

My friend has one of those wired ones with an alarm. Was thinking of borrowing it.
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Old 07-26-2005, 04:05 PM   #20
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The ones I have seen on the internet start at 100F and go to 400F.

Williams-Sonoma has a digital with an alarm but pricey at $35.00
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