"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-03-2006, 08:52 PM   #21
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue
...Where do you come by that information? Since I've seen it happen so often, with so many types of pans, I always assumed it was the tomatoes...

Robert Wolke, a professor of chemistry, has taken it upon himself to write a couple of books that explains or debunks popular cooking myths and situations.

What Einstein Told His Cook (1 & 2) address these issues. The holes in the aluminum answer came from there. Not being a chemist, I have to depend on others for help.

I'm surprised it happens for you with non-metallic pans. Maybe your marinana is made with plutonium!
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2006, 08:58 PM   #22
Executive Chef
 
VeraBlue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: northern NJ
Posts: 3,683
Wouldn't you pay money to hear what Einstein did tell his cooks? Or Louie Pasteur, too, for that matter?

The marinara is roma tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, basil, a touch of sugar and S&P....made with love and affection for my family...
__________________

__________________
How can we sleep while our beds are burning???
VeraBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2006, 09:01 PM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,169
As for holes in the foil and "melting" foil when cooking my lasagna, I've never experienced either. My recipe is a very old family one - from Sicily - and we love it.

I bake mine in a deep pan, so the foil never has a chance to touch the ingredients. Guess that's why I've never had my cheese stick or had holes form in the foil.

And, BTW, lasagna should always sit for from 10 to 20 minutes to allow it to "set," which makes it easy to cut and keeps it from being weepy and runny.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2006, 12:13 PM   #24
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
VeraBlue - I was not "taking a swipe" at you at all. Just because someone disagrees with your opinion doesn't automatically make it a "swipe". Sorry if the "plutonium" comment offended you. Geesh - get a sense of humor.

I have honestly never ever heard of aluminum foil melting into liquid on a dish. Perhaps it does happen in commercial ovens, but I don't think the majority of posters here are cooking in commercial ovens.

Has anyone else here besides VeraBlue have aluminum foil actually melt into liquid onto their food?
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2006, 12:17 PM   #25
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4
Thx!

Wow thanks for so many answers!

I only have ceramic pans so I will be making sure that my oven is correctly preheated, then covering with foil for maybe 50 mins so long as nothing is getting too brown and then uncovering and adding the cheese.

My last layer is always bechemel but I guess with the tin foil this won't start browning, right?

I think another problem was that I always make it the day before and I used to cook it for about 10 mins then refridgerate it and cook it properly the next day. I think I will make it, put it straight into the refridgerator and cook it all in one go the next day.

Being from the UK....what is marinara sauce?

Thanks!
__________________
clairebear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2006, 12:35 PM   #26
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
I definitely would nix cooking it for 10 minutes & then refrigerating it. There really isn't any sort of point to that. Either put it together & refrigerate it to bake the next day, or - from my point of view - even better, make & bake it, then refrigerate it & reheat it the next day.

As far as "Marinara Sauce", that is really just seasoned tomato sauce - just tomato sauce seasoned with minced onions, garlic, peppers (sometimes), oregano, etc. It's usually a smooth rather than chunky sauce. There are a lot of different personal recipes for it, but the basic ingredients remain the same.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2006, 03:09 PM   #27
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Greater Annapolis MD Area
Posts: 257
As a home cook only, over the years I have found that any tomato base dish made the night before eat holes in a aluminum foil coverings, doesn't matter whether glass or metal, only wax paper or plastic wrap coverings survive.
__________________
Elf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2006, 07:31 PM   #28
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NW NJ
Posts: 1,884
Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
I have honestly never ever heard of aluminum foil melting into liquid on a dish. Perhaps it does happen in commercial ovens, but I don't think the majority of posters here are cooking in commercial ovens.

Has anyone else here besides VeraBlue have aluminum foil actually melt into liquid onto their food?
I have not had this happen while cooking--I don't think I've ever put alum. foil on tom. sauce in the oven--but I have learned the hard way not to put foil on tomato based foods for storage. One night in the fridge and nasty discoloration of foil and food, as well as holes in the foil.
__________________
bullseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2006, 08:01 PM   #29
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elf
As a home cook only, over the years I have found that any tomato base dish made the night before eat holes in a aluminum foil coverings, doesn't matter whether glass or metal, only wax paper or plastic wrap coverings survive.
Same here. I've also had that happen with a few other things...ham salad, for instance.

Like Katie, my lasagna pan is deep enough to cover with foil without it touchiing the lasagna.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 05:57 AM   #30
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
If you use pyrex or ceramic, you can (heaven forbid!) "cheat" and ... well, I hate to admit it, if it is browned and not hot in the middle ...... NUKE IT! It isn't a cardinal sin! (Venial, maybe!)
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.