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Old 08-07-2007, 02:41 PM   #11
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I wanted to touch base with all of you who helped me with my stirfry adventures. I still don't have it down yet, but the results are better each time. The kids are even getting into it. Here is a pic of one son making his first ever stirfry completely on his own! He overloaded the wok and didn't cook the veggies enough before adding the meat, but he figured that out without my needing to tell him and his next attempt was much improved. Best of all, we are having so much fun! (If it wasn't for ya'll, we'd still be eating frozen convenience foods every night.) So thanks again for all the help.
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Old 08-07-2007, 06:05 PM   #12
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Fisher’s Mom: Super congrats on making this change! I was just telling a friend that it seems absurd that so many people claim they ‘simply do not have the time to cook’ so they use pre-packaged meals. Nonsense! And how cool that your son is into it as well.

Keep up the good wok.
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Old 08-07-2007, 08:36 PM   #13
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Thanks Devora. I'm really thrilled we are doing it as a family. I'm hoping the boys will grow up and be able to cook well for their families (and then their wives will love me)!
Terry
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Old 08-07-2007, 10:10 PM   #14
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Sauces can be as simple or complex as you want them to be. Simply melt butter, add a splash of soy sauce, and a bit of corn starch slurry to thicken and you have a sauce. Another great sauce with many stir-fries is to use natural meat juices, be it form pork, chicken, beef, seafood, etc, and thicken it with a bit of cornstarch, using onion and garlic to sweeten and add flavor. It is said of garlic in asian culture, garlic is not to be tasted, but rather it is used as a subtle flavor that enhances the other flavors around it.

Try this simple stir-fry, making sure to do the prep work of chopping and organizing the ingredients before starting to cook.

Ingredients:
2 stalks celery, washed and bias-sliced (cut at an angle to the length)
1 carrot, peeled and bias sliced
1 stalk bok choy, washed and bias sliced
1 medium sized onion, peeled and cutfrom top to bottom into leafs
1 cup sugar-snap or snow peas, washed
1 clove fresh garlic, minced
1/4 tsp. ground ginger
LIte naturally brewed soy sauce
1 tbs. corns starch mixed with 1/2 cup water
Your choice of pork, chiken, or beef, sliced into thin strips
Coarse-grind black pepper
Peanut or sunflower oil.

Heat the wok over medium high heat for ten minutes. add about three tbs. of the oil. Imediately add the beef, and ginger, stirring constantly until just barely done. Remove from the wok and place in a serving bowl. Add the veggies, and garlic. Add 2 tbs. water, cover and steam the veggies until tender/crisp. Remove the veggies to the serving bowl. Thicken the pan juices with the cornstarch slurry over medium heat. Pour over the food and fold until all is coated with the sauce. Serve with rice.

Hint, if you make this dish with chicken, omit the soy sauce and add 2 cups of fresh bean sprouts to the veggie mixture. serve with plumb sauce.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 08-08-2007, 12:34 AM   #15
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Just some friendly advice, use a wooden spoon. It wont scratch your wok. Using metal will scrape it and thats no fun. Looks like a decent stir, just bring down the serving size a bit.
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Old 08-08-2007, 12:47 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ Mikey
Just some friendly advice, use a wooden spoon. It wont scratch your wok. Using metal will scrape it and thats no fun. Looks like a decent stir, just bring down the serving size a bit.
You are so right! That "shovel" came with the wok and I wondered at the time about it but I figured "what do I know". I now have wooden and bamboo utensils and they are so much better. You're right about the amount of food in the wok, too. I think we were cooking for 8 or 9 that day and hadn't figured out that stirfry is so fast that it's easy to do large meals in two wok "loads". Thanks for your help. I've read lots of your posts and you are obviously an accomplished cook so I'm honored and grateful for any advice from you!

Goodweed, I printed your recipe and shared it with my son, the one who seems to get a kick out of "wokking", and we're planning to try it tomorrow. I will let you know how we did and again, thanks so much for taking the time to lend a hand.

Terry
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Old 08-08-2007, 12:53 AM   #17
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Pea nut oil is used by %99 of asian cooks and Chinese restaurants. try some oyster sauce by *** chee, or a little black vinegar for a little sour taste it is mild.Asian sesamy oil is a major seasoning in Japan (I lived in Tokyo for 2 years) experiment. The Key to chinese cooking is one of my favorite cook book/ goes from basic to advanced real good.
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Old 08-08-2007, 12:55 AM   #18
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heya fishmum, sounds like you're having fun.

i haven't read thru everything, but has anyone suggested the various ways to use a wok, such as a steamer, or a smoker? take a wok on the wild side.

buy some cheap bamboo steamer inserts, and use the wok to produce the steam underneath.

or one thing i've wanted to try is tea smoked fish. use chopsticks to support a plate of fish "mid-wok", place tea in the dry bottom to smoke, and cover with the wok's dome lid.
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Old 08-08-2007, 01:17 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Hutchins
Pea nut oil is used by %99 of asian cooks and Chinese restaurants. try some oyster sauce by *** chee, or a little black vinegar for a little sour taste it is mild.Asian sesamy oil is a major seasoning in Japan (I lived in Tokyo for 2 years) experiment. The Key to chinese cooking is one of my favorite cook book/ goes from basic to advanced real good.
Thanks Dave. I have the oyster sauce on my list to buy but I've never heard of the black vinegar. It sounds tasty and I'll try it. I've been using peanut oil (mostly because I heard it had the highest smoking point and I have a tendency to burn everything) but I do want to try the sesame oil. Do I need to keep the temp lower?
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Old 08-08-2007, 01:25 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
heya fishmum, sounds like you're having fun.

i haven't read thru everything, but has anyone suggested the various ways to use a wok, such as a steamer, or a smoker? take a wok on the wild side.

buy some cheap bamboo steamer inserts, and use the wok to produce the steam underneath.

or one thing i've wanted to try is tea smoked fish. use chopsticks to support a plate of fish "mid-wok", place tea in the dry bottom to smoke, and cover with the wok's dome lid.
Hey BT, how did you know I have a wild side? Nope, I had no idea you could do other things with a wok. I've seen those bamboo steamers and wondered how you use them. The tea thing sounds so cool but I need to clarify. Do you put dry, loose tea in the bottom of the wok over high heat? What kind of fish would you try to start with? I've never smoked anything so can you give me an idea of how long to keep the fish in the tea smoke? (Are you starting to wish you'd never come across this thread?)
Terry
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