"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-01-2012, 12:57 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
chopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Colorado
Posts: 4,345
Sometimes I wonder if those pictures are real food. Why don't you take a picture of yours and we decide if it looks better than the "perfect" egg picture you posted. I'm guessing if you eat it really fast you may be able to remember it as a beautiful egg! Seriously, mine have never looked that good, but the fresher the egg the better they look. Isn't that funny-when we boil eggs we want the ones that have been sitting around awhile. :D
__________________

__________________
No matter where I serve my guests, it seems they like my kitchen best!
chopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 12:58 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by crankin View Post
I really enjoy making poached eggs and they usually come out very good, but looking nothing at all like many pictures. I'm wondering how they can produce such perfect looking poached eggs, or if it is somehow altered/edited to look especially good in pictures or on TV shows? For example, in this recipe photo:

Two Potato and Beet Hash with Poached Eggs and Greens Recipe | MyRecipes.com

Mine always come out much more scraggly looking and while they taste good and are cooked just fine, I can never get such a perfectly smooth and round shape. My method is:

1. Bring water to boil and then simmer in a skillet (few inches deep)
2. Add a splash of white vinegar
3. Break eggs into a small dish
4. Pour eggs slowly into water
5. Cook for 3-4 minutes
6. Remove with slotted spoon

Am I being foolish to think I could make eggs that look like that or is there a trick I am missing?
I eat greens every morning with two poached eggs...or, sometimes fried. I made a lovely potato-greek sausage hash yesterday. I had made fries the night before using freshly dug potatoes from the garden (thinner skinned potatoes = waxy potato. These are, IMO, better re: fried potatoes). I blanched the potatoes in the deep fryer at ~160F for about 7 minutes, drained well, blotted with paper towels, cubed them, put in a tupperware container in the fridge overnight. (Originally, I thought I'd flash freeze the potatoes and eat them as oven fries but then I remembered the sausage in the freezer and thought of making the hash.) In the morning, I put 1 tsp of bacon fat in a CI skillet, added 1 chopped onion (medium sized--from the garden so it had more moisture than a dried onion would have) and sauteed that until golden. I took the casings off 2 Greek-style sausage, added that, ground pepper, some chopped garlic. In the meantime, I steamed some Swiss Chard. When that was almost done, I poached the eggs. I also had a side of miso-mushroom stir-fried barley.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 01:04 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
If you have any of those eggs left, put them in a bowl of water and see if they float. If they do, they are older than 7 days' old and the white will not adhere to the yolk when poaching--no difference re: taste, just presentation. Fresh eggs don't float. They'd make great hb eggs because you need older eggs to get the shell to separate from the egg when peeling it. Trust me, fresh "today's eggs" are a b*tch to peel.
I ahve an egg poaching pan that steams eggs to perfection, and the little green pouches, that do a reasonable job. These are not truly poached eggs though. They are steamed, and very tasty.

My best poached eggs are actually called coddled eggs. You bring salted water to a boil, then back off the heat until the water is no longer moving. Break the eggs into the hot water, as close to the water as possible, and let the hot water cook the egg, without rapidly moving water and bubbles tearing the egg apart. The egg will hold it's shape and produce a minimum of jellyfish looking eggwhite.

I've tried the vinegar and rapidly stired water technique. These are called funnel eggs. I've had no luck making that work personally. I'm sure someone has mastered it, or it wouldn't be so well known.

Coddled eggs are the easiest method I know to poach and season the egg so that it tastes and looks great.

Oh, and this is also the secret to making those long, lovely strands of egg in egg-drop soup. You turn the neat down before drizzling in a steady stream of beaten egg.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 01:47 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I ahve an egg poaching pan that steams eggs to perfection, and the little green pouches, that do a reasonable job. These are not truly poached eggs though. They are steamed, and very tasty.

My best poached eggs are actually called coddled eggs. You bring salted water to a boil, then back off the heat until the water is no longer moving. Break the eggs into the hot water, as close to the water as possible, and let the hot water cook the egg, without rapidly moving water and bubbles tearing the egg apart. The egg will hold it's shape and produce a minimum of jellyfish looking eggwhite.

I've tried the vinegar and rapidly stired water technique. These are called funnel eggs. I've had no luck making that work personally. I'm sure someone has mastered it, or it wouldn't be so well known.

Coddled eggs are the easiest method I know to poach and season the egg so that it tastes and looks great.

Oh, and this is also the secret to making those long, lovely strands of egg in egg-drop soup. You turn the neat down before drizzling in a steady stream of beaten egg.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Somewhere in my many boxes, I have two of these:

PAIR OF VINTAGE ROYAL WORCESTER EGG CODDLERS IN ORIGINAL BOX | eBay

If I remember correctly, one adds a bit of butter, water, and the egg, and then lowers the coddler into gently boiling water for about 5-6 minutes. I love coddled eggs...I think they might be in the box marked "hutch..." I'll have to have a look on the weekend.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 02:09 PM   #15
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind
My best poached eggs are actually called coddled eggs. You bring salted water to a boil, then back off the heat until the water is no longer moving. Break the eggs into the hot water, as close to the water as possible, and let the hot water cook the egg...
That's the way I poach eggs too. Or coddle them. Whatever.

It makes sense that moving water will tend to tear the egg apart, and any boiling at all causes convective currents.

IMO the water needs to be dead still to make good poached eggs.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 02:15 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Over the rainbow
Posts: 1,272
I'm not really sure why you need poached eggs to look really good.

For us, they are a regular breakfast/lunch type meal. Poached eggs on toast.

I poach them simply in shallow water which is brought to the boil first. Bring down to a simmer and then turn the heat off. Just takes a few minutes.

Nowt fancy.
__________________
Gravy Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 02:29 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Yeah, as GQ says, best to turn off the heat just before adding the eggs.

I don't time them. When they look done they are done!
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 02:43 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
maybe you can find some of these over there,i've got some & they work everytime.or the four egg poaching pan further down the page
Green poachpod® in egg poaching and boiling at the home of creative kitchenware, Lakeland
My first thought on seeing the egg in the photo was that it was made with something like that.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 03:08 PM   #19
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393
If you look closely at the egg in the link, there is no white beyond the edge of the yolk. It had to be trimmed.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 03:24 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
no mayonnaise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 553
Maybe it's just me, but a little imperfection in a poached egg is nice. I like the rustic look. It can't be a mess, but it shouldn't look like it's fake either.
__________________

__________________
no mayonnaise is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
eggs

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.