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Old 02-04-2006, 10:01 PM   #11
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Michelemarie. There is one thing I stress to everyone I talk to about food. I even state it in nearly all of my recipes in my cookbooks. That is, the things you will learn from me, and from eveyone else on this site, or in any cookbook, or cooking school is simply a base of information.

I learned early in my adult career (electrical engineering technology), that the training you recieve, whether from the military schools, or at university level classes simply prepares you to go into the real world with a base of knowledge that will help you solve the various problems and tasks that lay before you. And that goes for cooking as well.

Like yourself, I have succesfully barbecued and roasted meats that people told me to braise. And there is no disrespect in your not following the advise given. To the contrary, it shows you have the courage to try new and different techniques. That is the hallmark of my cooking. I refuse to take anything as gospel. I try different things with every meal. I log the techniques that work, and discard those that don't. And remember, that not every piece of meat is the same. This time your roast came out great. Next time, using the same method, it may not. It depends on the quality of the meat, its age, marbling, etc.

I have found things that work every time, and found things that work some of the time. If you do a bit of research, you will find that the cross rib roast, also called an English roast can be roasted, grilled, and barbecued, if it is of sufficient quality. Also, tender for one person may be too tough for another. My wife is proof of that. Because of false teeth, she requires exeptionally tender meat and veggies. And to get tha degree of tenderness she needs, often, food must be prepared differently than I would prepare it for myself, or my children. But that's life. And that's the why you must learn as much as you can about as many ways of cooking as you can.

You never know when you will have to improvise, to substitute, or to create something that you've never made before, just to satisfy a unique situation.

No, I don't feel it disrespectful of you to not follow my advise. After all, that's just what it is, advise, not gospel. I aplaud you for taking a chance and trying something new.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 02-04-2006, 11:20 PM   #12
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Goodweed - thanks for your response - I really appreciate yours and everyones advice. Trying this recipe really was out of character for me - that is why I was so excited to share it with you.

You brought up a good point - not all pieces of meat are the same. YOu are exactly right, the next time I do this it may taste like shoe leather (like all my other roasts usually do) . I do plan on purchasing more of these roasts - one for pot roast in the crock and one for beef barley soup. I do remember someone telling me they bbq'd their pot roast and it was delicious, I couldn't fathom the idea!

If you ever get the chance and this type of roast is on sale - try this recipe. I appreciate your advice and look forward to reading more of it. Thanks my friend, for your advice and letting me share my experience with you.
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Old 02-05-2006, 07:57 AM   #13
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You can dry roast tough cuts of meat (if this was a ribeye, it is NOT a tough cut of meat) quite well IF you don't overcook them and you cut them against the grain. A sirloin tip is absolutely delicious roasted rare--better NOT to pot roast this cut. I would have roasted it to only 130* or 135* however.
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Old 02-05-2006, 08:08 AM   #14
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Gretchen, the recipe suggested taking it out at 125-130 degrees, however, I knew my DH wouldn't touch it - so I went to 145 - I made a note to try 140 next time - trying to find an agreeable temp for him and me -
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Old 02-05-2006, 09:02 AM   #15
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i can't believe there wasn't even 1 joke like "what did you say to make it cross, michele?"
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Old 02-05-2006, 09:09 AM   #16
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first laugh of the day buckytom, thanks!
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Old 02-05-2006, 10:16 AM   #17
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The point of cooking the meat to 130* is that after a rest period (which you should always do with a roast to let the juices redistribute into the meat) the temp will have risen to 140*. It continues to cook. So taking it out at a higher temp makes it overdone.
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Old 02-05-2006, 10:38 AM   #18
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Thats what I thought too Gretchen, but this roast only rose 2 degrees in 25 minutes, then started dropping - can't figure it out - but it was good!!
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Old 02-05-2006, 01:01 PM   #19
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Buckytom, I posted my pulled pork recipe that you asked for but it doesn't seem to be coming up in the recent list. Let me know if it still doesn't show.
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Old 08-21-2007, 12:05 PM   #20
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easy pot roast recipie

Cross rib is a tougher cut of meat and should be cooked as a pot roast! I suggest using a oven cooking bag . I used a turkey size bag added 2 tbs flour inside bag shook bag and added roast then mixed 1 pkt dry onion soup mix with water per instructions on the pkt put roast in bag and poured soup mix on roast . Add favorite veggies carrots celery parnips potatoes and surrounded roast closed bag and two small slits in bag to let the bag vent. cook as per instruction included with cooking bag usually 2 to 3 hours (depending on size of roast) should be fork tender and melt in your mouth
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