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Old 11-14-2005, 09:27 AM   #31
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350 to 450,I don't think it matters much.You need to make sure you mix the flour while browning to ensure it gets brown evenly.When it start turning the colour you want,watch it very carefully to ensure it doesn't burn.

Also make sure you don't have too little flour on a baking sheet,not only can it burn almost in a millisecond,it would take forever to make a few cups.So pile the flour on generously and keep turning to ensure even browning.

Have I said to watch the flour carefully so it doesn't burn.
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Old 11-14-2005, 11:06 AM   #32
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One of my aunts used the method of browning her meat quite well, then adding broth, water or whatever liquid she needed mixed with flour to thicken the sauce. It wasn't lumpy at all, but she did cook it awhile to make sure the flour taste was gone.
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Old 07-16-2006, 01:01 AM   #33
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i'm from louisiana where **** near 90% of everything we cook starts with a roux...

during gumbo season (october to february), we turn over ALL the roux-making to my father who uses vegetable oil, flour and a huuuuuuuuge fan. the fan is used to keep ALL the smoke alarms in the house from going off.

he'll make enough roux to last the whole gumbo season and it's about as dark as you can get WITHOUT being burned. i've asked several times how he does it. his reply..."you learn thru sweating over a cast iron skillet."
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Old 07-16-2006, 03:02 PM   #34
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Bake your roux ingredients in the oven at 350* for an hour, stir and bake another hour. Freeze.
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Old 08-26-2006, 11:34 AM   #35
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Lumpy Roux

Dear Food friend. the problem you are having is your heat is too high, turn it down to medium heat. Are you stirring with a wisk? it's the best utensil to use, and you want to stir quickly and continuous so you won't get the lumps. You do get brown specs because your burner is too high and the roux sauce is scorching. Hope this helps.
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Old 09-23-2006, 03:46 PM   #36
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I also do both methods. For a dark roux I heat clarified butter over medium heat and then add my flour, followed by veggies. For large meals witha short time-span I might even make it separately and store it on the side to save time.

For light sauces or soups I usually saute my veggies/mirepoix and then sprinkle flour over them - scraping continuously. This method is usually a bit "drier", as the veggies grab onto the flour with a death grip. You have to be really careful with your heat and scraping up whats on the bottom. I use this method for veloute/bechamel and the closely related pan gravy. I'm not so sure I would choose this method for a dark or peanut-butter roux.
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I've read about toasting the flour separately in th oven, but I've never tried it. I'll have to give it a go...

EDIT: Preventing lumps is all about whisking like a madman and slowly trickling the liquid in until you have a consistency that of gravy. I usually tilt the pot I warmed the liquid in just enough so it runs down the side and drips off the bottom of the saucier into the saucier with the roux. Then you can gradually pick up the addition rate (while still whisking like a madman). Brown chunks darker than the rest of roux means you're not whisking the roux well enough, the heat is too high, or you need a thicker pan that heats more evenly. Burnt Roux is not fixable... theres no turning back if you get black bits or chunks... time to start over...

Another issue might be the style pan you use. Most straight-sided pans/pots trap a ring of Roux along the bottom of the pot where the wall meets the base. Most whisks are curved, so they can't get in there. My personal pan arsenal cntains no saucepots. I use sauciers instead, which have walls that curve outward. This allows the whisk to reach everything, and increases the surface area of the liquid for faster reductions. Sauciers are roughly equivalent in price to saucepots, but most of the cheaper companies don't make them.
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Old 09-23-2006, 05:05 PM   #37
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I only use roux to make bechamel sauce - I've never cooked a gumbo in my life!
Equal parts of butter and flour. Melt the butter in the pan. When barely melted, lower the heat and stir in the flour with a wooden spoon. Keep stirring until the paste is smooth. Then cook until it bubbles a little. Now add the milk a little at a time, incorporating it into the roux until its smooth. Keep on stirring with your wooden spoon. Gradually add all the milk this way. Now bring to the boil and it should thicken. If it's too thick for your liking, add a little more milk. Add grated cheese if you wish, and a pinch of nutmeg. Wonderful on steamed cauliflower!
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Old 09-23-2006, 05:07 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliveb
I only use roux to make bechamel sauce - I've never cooked a gumbo in my life!
bless your heart, cliveb. You must come up here for dinner some time. It's the least I can do after you turned me on to that lovely garlic cheesecake.

I'll even get the big shrimp, and real andouille sausage.
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Old 09-23-2006, 06:21 PM   #39
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With butter and flour, lighter for mac-n-cheese and darker for gumbo and other thick gravies.
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Old 09-23-2006, 07:09 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
Another issue might be the style pan you use. Most straight-sided pans/pots trap a ring of Roux along the bottom of the pot where the wall meets the base. Most whisks are curved, so they can't get in there. My personal pan arsenal cntains no saucepots. I use sauciers instead, which have walls that curve outward. This allows the whisk to reach everything, and increases the surface area of the liquid for faster reductions. Sauciers are roughly equivalent in price to saucepots, but most of the cheaper companies don't make them.
Another thing I forgot to mention, is that I use a flat whisk to make my roux with, not a ballon whisk. This is for the same reason as you use a saucier to make roux in. I always use a cast iron skillet to make a roux, and the flat whisk will reach into the corners of the pan.
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