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Old 09-24-2006, 12:16 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
...Preventing lumps is all about whisking like a madman and slowly trickling the liquid in until you have a consistency that of gravy...

I've never had to "wisk like a mad man".

When you have made a roux, the flour granules are coated with fat. This prevents them from sticking together to form lumps.

I add liquid to a roux wisking steadily to mix in the liquid until the consistency is uniform throughout. Lumps are not a problem.
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Old 09-24-2006, 01:05 AM   #42
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anyone here ever do the opposite and add the roux to the scalded milk while whisking? i was taught this way in culinary school and have to admit that it works quite well, but in the real world i still add the liquid to the roux
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:44 AM   #43
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When I use the second method we were talking about (fat>veggies>flour) I sometimes have a roux that is a bit dry from the veggies grabbing hold of the flour, and the flour moistening with some of the water in the veggies. I might add a bit more fat, but as I said, I only use this method for light Rouxs. I often find that this type of roux is easier to get lumps with, because as you said, a separately cooked Roux has it's flour particles suspended in fat (and this method isn't as thorough). So I usually whisk at a pretty good pace when I add liquid to the fat>veggie>flour method. I use this method for my veloute, bechamel, and pan gravy sauces.

Making the roux separate is probably convenient and much more speedy in a commerical kitchen, but it just seems un-natural and artificial in the home (for me at least... I'm just odd like that).
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:54 AM   #44
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With veggies in the mix, you're right. if you don't cook off most of the moisture from the veggies before adding the flour, you are going to be fighting lumps.
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Old 09-24-2006, 01:53 PM   #45
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Thumbs up Mjohnson

It is much easier to make your Roux first on medium heat, then add your liquids your liquids should be warm, if you add a cold liquid to your roux it will lump up, or you can temper the sauce , by addding a small amount of roux to your not heated liquid and stir the mixture together, then pour back in the roux wisking constantly stirrring with a wisk. You should have a lump free sauce. Good luck
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Old 09-25-2006, 03:56 PM   #46
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http://www.jfolse.com/fr_rouxs.htm

In addition to my mom, this is what I go look at when I need some info about rouxs.
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Old 10-31-2006, 04:57 PM   #47
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The second method you have listed is called "singer", pronounced 'son-zhay'. It works just as well as long as you dont plan on making a brown roux.
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Old 11-01-2006, 08:41 PM   #48
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Smile Roux

Thanks for the information about the roux, jbob24
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