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Old 08-18-2007, 07:57 PM   #1
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How many fresh tomatoes to use instead of canned ones?

Hi,

I am trying to get in the habit of making food from scratch as much as possible. I see a lot of recipes that require stewed canned tomatoes. How many fresh tomatoes could I use in place of a can of stewed tomatoes that is, for example, 10.5 ounces?

Thanks!

Jamie

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Old 08-18-2007, 09:03 PM   #2
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I'm trying to remember how many came out of a can........?

Maybe 7-9 Romas in a 16oz can? That would be "whole canned tomatoes"
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Old 08-18-2007, 09:12 PM   #3
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Wait...14 1/2oz can. Not the 'regular' size can but one size larger. Also keep in mind, if it calls for whole tomatoes, the recipe might also mean the tomato puree that is usually in the can as well. I'd say 4 pureed tomatoes with a 1/2 c water and 7-9 whole tomatoes would equal a 14 1/2oz can.

Obviously open for corrections...just my "ballpark".
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Old 08-18-2007, 10:08 PM   #4
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I usually use 6 Ė 8 whole medium sized Globe/Slicing Tomatoes for sauce. That's about two 14.5 oz cans worth. For Romas, it's more....about 12-14. Some people peel the tomatoes first, which can be a pain. To do so, blanch them whole in hot water for 1-2 minutes, remove to cool a bit, then begin peeling the skin off.

Or just roast them whole and peel the skin once they are done (they have collapsed a bit but still hold their shape).

Personally, I don't peel mine. I cut my tomatoes in half and roast them cut side up at 350 Ė 400 for 30-45 minutes. Once they start to collapse a bit, I know theyíre done. Take them out to a plate to cool, and save any pan juices that have collected. Once the tomatoes are cool, put them in a blender or food processor with the collected juices and puree. Sometimes I add a splash of wine and a few cloves of garlic to the processor as well.

With 6 Ė 8 tomatoes, I use around 2 cups of liquid (more or less depending on consistency desired). Usually 3/4 cup chicken stock and the rest (1 1/4) wine. A red is good, but I often use a sweet white since I have it on hand most often, and typically donít have to add extra sugar when using a sweeter wine.

When using a food processor to puree the roasted tomatoes, you donít have to use a slow cooker to break the tomatoes down since they already are. You can instead go straight to the pot and begin making your sauce. Or, use the slow cooker if you want to just start the sauce and walk away. Iíve done both depending on my mood and schedule.

If your sauce isnít as thick as you like, you can thicken it with tomato paste (from a can) or a slurry of corn starch and cold water. On occasion Iíve use a slurry of cornstarch, and I typically add a little (about 1/8 a teaspoon or lessÖ..small shake or pinch if you will) of tomato bullion powder to the slurry. Iíve got a 7.9 oz jar of it made by Knorr. Itís great for stuff like this, but it is a bit salty, so go easy with it if you find it and use it.

Speaking of tomato bullion - Another great use for it is to add some to your rice water as the rice cooks. It gives the rice a great flavor and turns it a pinkish color. This is wonderful for beef stew and rice or chili and rice. I sometimes also add it to my pasta water. You can even sprinkle some into your ground beef if youíre making meatballs, taco meat, meat sauce for spaghetti, etc.

A strange little treat for myself that some may find weird is to make some rice with the tomato bullion in the water. Sautee some diced onion and jalapeno (occasionally bell pepper as well) in oil as the rice cooks. Then mix the rice, peppers and onion together and slather with hot sauce for a moist rice dish and chow down. I love it. Itís a nice alternative to Spanish rice on taco night too. Good stuff.
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Old 08-18-2007, 10:15 PM   #5
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A 14 ounce can of tomoto equals approx. 1 3/4 cups of tomato.
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Old 08-18-2007, 10:19 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
A 14 ounce can of tomoto equals approx. 1 3/4 cups of tomato.
The only problem with that isÖ..is that coarsely chopped, finely diced, pureed, tightly packed, loosely packed, with or without liquid? Each of these cases changes the total number of tomatoes used.
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Old 08-19-2007, 01:34 AM   #7
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Probably 8 slicing or 14 romas for 14 oz cans. Here, the stores sell 18 oz cans, so about 10 or so slicing and 18 romas. Making meals from scratch is rather nice. You can control how much of everything you want. In the canned tomatoes, there's usually a high salt content. When making tomatoe sauce, I try to get the tomatoes straight off the vine, literally. I make loads of cans and jars then freeze them for the winter when I want them. As keltin stated, for the sauce, don't bother peeling the tomatoes. I tried and it becomes a mess rather fast. If you really want to though, toss the tomatoes onto a BBQ until they sort of shrink or droop. The skin should be seperated and it's easier to peel off. You get a slightly smoother texture than with the skin but not a terrible difference in taste. If you blend it for long enough, the skin will be blended and you'll get a smooth texture also.
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Old 08-19-2007, 08:15 AM   #8
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Jamie...

For substituting fresh tomaotes for a 10.5 oz can, I think I would use 2 large (12 oz +) tomatoes or maybe 3 or 4 smaller ones as a starting point. Then adjust to your personal taste.



Enjoy!
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Old 08-19-2007, 08:53 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llvllagical_llkook View Post
Probably 8 slicing or 14 romas for 14 oz cans. Here, the stores sell 18 oz cans, so about 10 or so slicing and 18 romas. Making meals from scratch is rather nice. You can control how much of everything you want. In the canned tomatoes, there's usually a high salt content. When making tomatoe sauce, I try to get the tomatoes straight off the vine, literally. I make loads of cans and jars then freeze them for the winter when I want them. As keltin stated, for the sauce, don't bother peeling the tomatoes. I tried and it becomes a mess rather fast. If you really want to though, toss the tomatoes onto a BBQ until they sort of shrink or droop. The skin should be seperated and it's easier to peel off. You get a slightly smoother texture than with the skin but not a terrible difference in taste. If you blend it for long enough, the skin will be blended and you'll get a smooth texture also.

I think your numbers a high. There is no way you are going to get 14 roma tomatos into a 14 ounce can. That would suggest the tomatos are an ounce each.
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Old 08-19-2007, 11:17 AM   #10
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To chime in here, if you are buying your tomatoes in the winter at a grocery store (I notice you did not say where you are from), the canned variety is much better than the ones in the grocery store. Canned beans and canned tomatoes are a wonderful thing. As are frozen vegetables. Right now I have so many tomatoes I really am not sure what I am going to do with them. But in March and April, I will be dying for them, and be happy to have the canned variety. Don't throw out the baby with the bath water.
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