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Old 07-07-2016, 12:28 PM   #11
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Though the flavor of artificial flavors is very similar to the original extract, it is not exact. What make the original different is the cocktail of chemicals made by the plant, from which the flavor is derived. Vanilla has a stronger, and more complex favor than does vanillan, the artificial flavor. Vanilla has not only the specific molecule for vanilla flavor, but also contains other volatile chemical compounds that make the flavor from vanilla bean extract taste different than the artificial vanilla. Read this for more information.

Chemicals Are Your Friends! » Everything you never wanted to know about vanilla

Now that you've been made properly squeamish, know that in backing, ice cream making, and cooking with vanilla, that the flavor does not stand up to heat. It simply evaporates off, except for the vanillan. Artificial vanilla stands up to the heat of cooking as it's flavor compound is the only part of the vanilla flavor to not immediately boil off. So, if you are cooking an ice cream base, or a pastry cream base, or any battered recipe like cookies and cakes, don't add the pure extract until the base is cooled. If you are using artificial vanilla, you can add it at any time. Also, alcohal is often used to extract more flavor compounds from the vanilla bean, and so that favor is found only in pure vanilla extract, but not in the artificially.

I hope this helps.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-07-2016, 12:30 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by AlexR View Post
Does anyone on the forum feel that ecological and economic factors aside, artificial flavorings are actually indistinguishable from complex natural ones?


Alex R.


Did you not read the articles I linked to?
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Old 07-07-2016, 12:37 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by AlexR View Post
Personally, I would pay significantly more for truffle oil made with real truffles.
Maybe the only way to see whether this reasoning is valid would be to do a taste test.
However, because of the cursed labelling, I don’t know what’s natural and what isn’t!

I am a wine geek who loves blind tasting. I especially like it when inexpensive wines clobber prestigious expensive ones when compared side by side.
How would I feel if some chemist concocted an artificial cocktail that I quite enjoyed?
Perhaps considering that “natural is best” is just wishful thinking…

Does anyone on the forum feel that ecological and economic factors aside, artificial flavorings are actually indistinguishable from complex natural ones?
Can the chemists come close to reproducing just about all common flavors?

Alex R.
Quote: "You argued that because something is 'natural' it is therefore valid, justified, inevitable, good or ideal.

"Many 'natural' things are also considered 'good', and this can bias our thinking; but naturalness itself doesn't make something good or bad. For instance murder could be seen as very natural, but that doesn't mean it's good or*justifiable.

"Example: The medicine man rolled into town on his bandwagon offering various natural remedies, such as very special plain water. He said that it was only natural that people should be wary of 'artificial' medicines such as antibiotics."

https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/appeal-to-nature
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Old 07-07-2016, 02:45 PM   #14
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jennyema,</SPAN>
jennyema,
I have a healthy scepticism and believe that first-hand experience from people on this forum – foodies – will give me a much more accurate and in-depth perspective than the studies cited.


Got garlic,
I’m confused by your post:
“Quote: "You argued that because something is 'natural' it is therefore valid, justified, inevitable, good or ideal”.
Was this referring to me?

You also wrote “naturalness itself doesn't make something good or bad”.
I agree 100%.


Chief Longiwnd of the North:</SPAN>
I found your specific comements very interesting, and they show that the question is not cut and dried.

All the best,
Alex
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Old 07-07-2016, 02:51 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
There is a yellow candy, banana flavored with artificial flavoring. I personally think the flavorist that put the banana flavor together with artificial flavoring had different taste buds than I do. I absolutely hate the flavor but I like bananas. My sister loves the artificial banana flavored candy.

I'm a big fan of the flavor 'red', because most red candy tastes good to me. My kids always made fun of my preference for 'red'. "Mom, red is not a flavor!"
LOL

Sometimes you can get a hint of strawberry or cherry that brings the real fruit to mind, even if there will never be any doubt which is which. Artificial raspberry is usually more distinctive. But I agree that the "red flavor" is usually my first choice.
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Old 07-07-2016, 02:58 PM   #16
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LOL

Sometimes you can get a hint of strawberry or cherry that brings the real fruit to mind, even if there will never be any doubt which is which. Artificial raspberry is usually more distinctive. But I agree that the "red flavor" is usually my first choice.
lol, I was a very responsible parent too, teaching my kids about both the food pyramid and the candy pyramid. The candy pyramid has colors and flavors of candy on the bottom, then a layer of nuts, going up, and then chocolate on the top. The chocolate was on the top because when it got warm, the chocolate melted and that's how candy bars were invented.
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Old 07-07-2016, 04:00 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by AlexR View Post
Got garlic,
I’m confused by your post:
“Quote: "You argued that because something is 'natural' it is therefore valid, justified, inevitable, good or ideal”
Was this referring to me?

You also wrote “naturalness itself doesn't make something good or bad”.
I agree 100%.
You said "Perhaps considering that “natural is best” is just wishful thinking…"

I responded to that with a quote from the page I linked to. The site is called "Your Logical Fallacy is" and the page is "Appeal to Nature." Your idea that "natural is best" is a logical fallacy - it's not logically correct and it's not factually correct. Just because something is "natural" doesn't mean it's best. Lots of people think it does, but it doesn't. As another example, dying of an infection is natural. Taking antibiotics to prevent dying is not.
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Old 07-07-2016, 06:50 PM   #18
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jennyema,</SPAN>
jennyema,
[FONT="Verdana"]I have a healthy scepticism and believe that first-hand experience from people on this forum – foodies – will give me a much more accurate and in-depth perspective than the studies cited.
Well there's probably no bigger and better informed foodie that is font of firsthand knowledge than Kenji Lopez-Alt from Serious Eats -- that was my second link.

My first was to Cooks Illustrated that rather laboriously taste tests everything on the face of the earth. They're pretty foodie too.
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Old 07-07-2016, 11:13 PM   #19
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Ingredient listing in the US consists of lies and dammed lies. "Truffle flavor" or any other "flavor" is nonsense. Read carefully, because the industry has 30+ descriptions for (e.g.) sugar that never mention the word, like "evaporated cane juice" (that one courtesy of Chobani "yogurt").

Sure, artificial vanilla and some others are good, but you absolutely cannot go wrong by making everything from scratch, from good-quality basic ingredients. You wouldn't be here if you didn't like to cook, after all.

Perhaps good news is new labelling regulations are being introduced, claiming to be clearer, but then that's what they always say.
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Old 07-08-2016, 12:02 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by outRIAAge View Post
Ingredient listing in the US consists of lies and dammed lies. "Truffle flavor" or any other "flavor" is nonsense. Read carefully, because the industry has 30+ descriptions for (e.g.) sugar that never mention the word, like "evaporated cane juice" (that one courtesy of Chobani "yogurt").
Care to expand on that? Sugar in some form is a component of many, many foods. Crush them in water, evaporate, et voilŕ! Sugar.

Additionally, there are several forms of sugar, including sucrose, glucose and fructose. So I would expect to see different descriptions of sugar on package labels. Please explain why you have a problem with that.
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