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Old 05-17-2005, 01:46 PM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
'


I know you are right, I'm just being lazy. Also I have tendency to over do it. Whenever I cook, I cook too much. Of course I have an excuse, a big family, but it is just an excuse. For some reason I canít cook a little, even when I want to I end up with a lot. Quite few times I start cooking in one pot and then all of a sadden I have to switch to a bigger one. I guess itís all because I donít use recipes.
LOL, I have the same problem at home at times but I learned that I can save it for rice pudding or fried rice dishes or even put it in a soup in a day or so and it's fine.
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Old 05-19-2005, 01:23 PM   #82
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Hmmmmmm! Let's see.., A cup is 8 oz. but a cup of flour only weighs 5oz. but everybody knows that 8oz.= 1/2 pound so do I need a half a pound of flour, but a half pound doesn't fit in a cup or 5 oz. and if I sift it, it's like almost two cups?, but 226.8 grams = 1/2 pound (U.S.) sifted or other wise.

**** smart @$$ metric system. (only kidding)
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Old 05-19-2005, 01:36 PM   #83
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silvercliff_46
Hmmmmmm! Let's see.., A cup is 8 oz. but a cup of flour only weighs 5oz. but everybody knows that 8oz.= 1/2 pound so do I need a half a pound of flour, but a half pound doesn't fit in a cup or 5 oz. and if I sift it, it's like almost two cups?, but 226.8 grams = 1/2 pound (U.S.) sifted or other wise.

**** smart @$$ metric system. (only kidding)
TMI!!!!

All of that math is giving me a headache.
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Old 05-19-2005, 01:55 PM   #84
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The USA is too soft on some issues. The metric system is one of them. All those years ago, when the plan was to convert, too much 'discussion' was permitted and those whiners who thought the metric system conversion would be "too hard" swayed the government to abandon its plan.

Many years ago, Australia converted to the metric system. The government set a date and, while there were some people who moaned about it, the attitude of the government was: "It is for the best and we will all have to get used to it." And guess what? They did. If something like that is forced on you, you just adapt.

The metric system is a far more logical system of weights and measures and, if you HAD to use it, I'm sure that you could all learn it and see the benefits of it in no time.
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Old 05-19-2005, 05:13 PM   #85
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The metric system is easier to use but you will still find the same problems with the measurements between solids and liquids, as is shown above. A measure of volume isn't a measure of weight in the metric system unless you are using water. Any other substance is not going to work any better than what we have now.
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Old 05-19-2005, 05:37 PM   #86
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The UK half-heartedly said we'd go metric way back in the 70s. My children only learned about metric measurements (as opposed to avoirdupois and Imperial) at school. I kept (stubbornly) to the Imperial.

A couple of years ago, we were forced to change. No foods could be sold by anything other than metric. BUT, in typical British fashion, we get round it by asking for 'a pound of ham', '6 ounces of cheese' etc and the shop assistant kindly looks at the conversion chart she has behind the counter and says 'oh yes that 500g' or whatever.... SIMPLE!

However, all my recent cookery book purchases have been in metric - which means I use metric for some recipes and Imperial for my older, tried and tested favourites.

Liquid and solids are easy - millilitres and grammes or kilos.... No probs!
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Old 05-19-2005, 10:18 PM   #87
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Sometimes I still convert from metric to imp simply to assess temps. 30dC = 88dF - that's warm.

Being a metric converted country, in aviation we still measure speed in knots, distance in nautical miles and altitude in feet. BUT, when assessing VMC (flying conditions), visibility must at least 5000 metres, not 3 nautical miles, clearance from cloud - 1000ft above 500ft below and 1500 metres horizontal separation. All mixed up. As far as I'm aware, knots etc are still the International standard. Oh, and fuel calcs for some aircraft have to be converted from US gallons, as opposed to imperial gallons, to litres, different again

Cooking measures can be confusing, because an imp cup holds 230mls & a metric cup holds 250mls, a cup of flour weighs 130gms or imp 120gms. I have to be careful which measures I use because the mistakes are almost outnumbering the successful conversions.

The US is halfway to "metrification". Dollars & Cents have virtually trained you guys. On Feb 14, 1966 we changed from L.S.D. or pounds shillings & pence to decimal currency. That was a rort - if all your money was assessed in Pounds, after that date you automatically lost 20% of your worth off the top. 24 shillings = 1 pound = $2, 20 shillings also = $2.00. I was poor and young so it didn't matter. The math was crazy, but fun to learn. Our British brothers & sisters have also done the same exercise - changing from LSD to New Pence and they are still with us.
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Old 05-19-2005, 10:34 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
....... BUT, in typical British fashion, we get round it by asking for 'a pound of ham', '6 ounces of cheese' etc and the shop assistant kindly looks at the conversion chart she has behind the counter and says 'oh yes that 500g' or whatever.... SIMPLE!
Still happens here as well Ishbel. "Can you loan me a couple of Bob mate?" Just going down the road for a pound of spuds...... The 5 gallon drum rather than "the 20 litre drum", a pound od snags etc etc. the term 'hundredweight' (cwt) gets blank looks from anyone under 40.
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Old 05-21-2005, 08:53 AM   #89
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I still see little old ladies in my butcher's shop asking, in a broad Scots accent 'Gie's a punna mince, son' - to the elderly man behind the counter!
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Old 05-22-2005, 08:45 AM   #90
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Yeah, I think inertia is the culprit of the US not converting... been doing it that way so long, have to keep doing it that way. Which reminds me of my home state of Indiana, which does not observe daylight savings time. For the hoosiers of the state, it means resetting their clocks twice a year... which is... what?... too difficult or something???? They seem to think so. Back, forward... I'm sure there would be a large population coming into work 2 hours late in the Spring and 2 hours early in the fall.

I can't imagine what they would do if they actually had to ask for half of a kilo of ground meat instead of 1 pound. Complete pandemonium, I'm sure!!
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