"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-17-2007, 01:42 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
I agree with you. Twelve minutes isn’t long enough to do bone-in chicken IMO. But, there is that little bit of wording:

Turn the chicken over and continue to cook for 6 minutes or until the chicken is golden brown and the chicken is completely cooked.

You can read that two different ways. One way means less than 6 minutes (no way) and the other way means more than 6 minutes (yep!). I’d say at least 15 minutes, but usually around 20 minutes at 375˚ F.
__________________

__________________
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2007, 01:10 AM   #12
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 74
Cooking bone-in chicken for 6 minutes or less is no good unless it's in a large bonfire, which case, it's probably charred. I like to make a cut in a piece of chicken, which will be my piece. If it's cooked thouroughly, the others probably are also. For bone in, I make a cut closer to the bone. It's not a huge one, just a tiny one.

As for the breading, I also let it sit. If I'm making some large meal, I make the chicken first, let it sit. Depending what it is, about 15 minutes has passed. If the other plates aren't terribly long to make, I make the chicken first, then the rest then watch some TV.
__________________

__________________
llvllagical_llkook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2007, 10:23 AM   #13
Head Chef
 
Caine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: CHINATOWN
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
First, use three pans, not two, to bread the chicken. Fist pan is plain flour, which is going to ensure a dry piece of chicken. Second pan is egg, which is going to be the glue that holds the breading to the chicken. Third pan is seasoned flour, which is the breading that is going to crisp up in the fryer and what you are going to taste when you eat the chicken.

Second, make sure you have dried the brined chicken with paper towels, and make sure the first flour dunking has completely covered the chicken with no bare spots. Breading does not stick to wet chicken.

Third, leave the milk out of the egg. You are counting on the egg to make the second four dunking stick to the chicken, and the milk just dilutes the adhesiveness (big word, huh?) of the egg.
__________________
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2007, 12:26 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
GrillingFool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: usa
Posts: 2,223
What a great Cooking Secret!
Let the breading sit!

Golly gee whiz that is exciting, because it might
just have solved one of the Reasons I Do Not Fry!

:) excellent! Thanks! :)
__________________
GrillingFool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 11:22 AM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
The Lee Brothers Southern Cookbook (which won a James Beard award) prescribes a basic dredge for all their fried food (chicken, fish, okra) that works perfectly for me. It's 1/2 cup flour, 3 tbs cornmeal, 2 tsp salt, and 1 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper. I just throw the pieces in a bag and coat them with it. No egg, no buttermilk, nothing. For fish, they recommend adding some breadcrumbs, but I haven't tried that yet. When I do, I'm going to try using panko.

If you make double this recipe, it keeps in the fridge until you're ready to use it again.

They recommend, if you want more crusty chicken, dredging it once, then dipping it in a mixture of 1 egg and 1 cup buttermilk, then dredging it again. I haven't tried that, because I like it the other way. If you do try it, though, they recommend cooking it at a lower temperature (275 to 300, rather than 350) and turning it more frequently (every 3 minutes).

I don't mean to sound like an ad for Williams Sonoma, but if you use that three dish breading method somebody else recommended, they make a set of three nesting metal pans -- the perfect size for a piece of chicken or a porkchop -- with a little projecting lip on one side so you can interlock them side by side. They store easily, clean up easily, and I can't believe how easy they make breading pork chops -- which I do by coating them in flour, then in egg, then in breadcrumbs. Flour pan, egg pan, breadcrumbs pan. A-B-C.
__________________
ducdebrabant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 12:25 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
Caine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: CHINATOWN
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducdebrabant View Post
I don't mean to sound like an ad for Williams Sonoma, but if you use that three dish breading method somebody else recommended, they make a set of three nesting metal pans -- the perfect size for a piece of chicken or a porkchop -- with a little projecting lip on one side so you can interlock them side by side. They store easily, clean up easily, and I can't believe how easy they make breading pork chops -- which I do by coating them in flour, then in egg, then in breadcrumbs. Flour pan, egg pan, breadcrumbs pan. A-B-C.
Excellent idea except for one thing. Once you've purchased the pans from Williams Sanoma, you can't afford to buy chicken!

ETA: I use three Marie Callender pie tins!
__________________
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2007, 10:07 AM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
breading trays

I just looked it up and the price is $34.95 (look under "breading trays"). I suppose that could be lower, but they quickly became one of my favorite kitchen items, so I think it was well worth it. As I said, they nest (and they're small), so they store really well. And they hook together, side by side. I have an apartment kitchen, so three pie tins side by side would be a lot of counter space for me.
__________________
ducdebrabant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2007, 11:38 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 6
I know its going to sound odd, but I have seen this work too. Instead of dealing with frying fresh chicken parts, sometimes I twice cook them. Supposing I have a marinade/brine, I put it all, marinade and chicken into a pot and let it reduce under the heat. Maybe in high heat for a few minutes, you dont really want to cook this through. Then I fry them again, with batter or without. Here I can focus a little more on browning since I know that the chicken is already cooked/cooked halfway.

I do this especially when I get pressed for time, but mostly when I want chicken. The flavor seeps into the chicken and it takes care of bone-in situations. When the chicken is hot from reducing, flour sticks more.


Ha-ha just sharing. Letting you know quirky ways can work for other people. : )
__________________
expresswade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2007, 04:10 PM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
It doesn't sound odd at all, it sounds like barbecuing. You should always parboil chicken or ribs before putting them on the barbecue. So yes, I'm sure this does work.
__________________
ducdebrabant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2007, 04:56 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducdebrabant View Post
You should always parboil chicken or ribs before putting them on the barbecue. So yes, I'm sure this does work.
I am here to politely agree to disagree I NEVER parboil before grilling. I control my heat source so they cook slower - but that is all.

mmmmmm.........it's about time for some fried chicken and I'm looking forward to putting these tips to work!
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.