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Old 08-24-2009, 08:05 AM   #1
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Injecting stuff into dough?

Having wondered about a baking method that would allow me to use baking powder and yet store prepared doughs in fridge for a few days, I thought that what might work is the intravenous injection.

I could either inject air before baking, or baking powder, or could put baking soda into the dough and when injecting I might put in just the lemon juice, thus activating the reaction at the point of the needle.

I don't believe baking powder with water would work, as that would bubble up straight in the syringe hold.

Assuming you want to keep the dough in the fridge for a day or two, don't want to use yeast and don't want to freeze, which would you choose?

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Old 08-24-2009, 08:21 AM   #2
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The normal acid partner to using baking soda is buttermilk, but why you are attempting to do all of those other things...? Gluten formation prevents what you are trying to do. An injection will only make one air pocket.

Well, good luck to you.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:49 AM   #3
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BTW, there are yeast breads and there are quick breads. Yeast breads refrigerate easily for a day or two. Quick breads (using baking soda/powder or whatever the recipe calls for) are meant to be mixed and baked all at one time. They are so easy to put together, and the chemical process that gives the product its lift has already begun creating CO2, they must be baked immediately.

I would recommend you bake it and then refrigerate or freeze it.
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Old 08-24-2009, 09:28 AM   #4
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Quote:
and the chemical process that gives the product its lift has already begun creating CO2, they must be baked immediately
That is why I want to delay the reaction until before the baking. Obviously I can't add the powder to ready dough from outside, so I want to push it in.

Gluten does help keep the air inside the air pocket, but I think that if I insert a reasonable amount of baking powder, the bubble will burst into multiple smaller ones. So doing this on multiple places might yield something that is eatable.

I am not exactly a fan of yeast breads as even a small amount leaves rather unpleasant taste (for me). So I am trying to devise a way that does not use yeast and allows for batch preparation of multiple days' servings and for baking just in time.
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Old 08-24-2009, 09:59 AM   #5
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If it's merely convenience you're looking for, there are a number of frozen doughs, both loaf size and rolls that only need baking. They are quick and inexpensive.

The bubble you are introducing will not burst into a lot of little ones. It will only grow until it finds a way out the top or side (have you ever had an eclair or puff pastry?) A quick bread (notice the word quick), only lacks one or two liquid ingredients, (usually an egg and buttermilk, but not always) a simple stir or two (the less stirring the better unless you're making bread - folding is the preferred method) and then right into the oven.

If in doubt, practice and experiment. I'm certain many of the viewers of this site would appreciate your report on what you discover. I know I would! Good luck!
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Old 08-24-2009, 10:43 AM   #6
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I'm not sure that you could get any ingredient evenly distributed within dough by injecting it. And even if you could, it might take longer to accomplish than whipping up a batch of quick bread from scratch! lol
My suggestion would be to do one of three things.
1) Bake and freeze the bread. Quick breads freeze pretty well and can be defrosted in the fridge, on the counter, or in the microwave.
2) Measure and combine all of your dry ingredients in one bowl and all of your wet ingredients in another, and set them aside until you're ready to bake. Cover your dry ingredients and leave at room temp if using white flour or refrigerate if using whole grain flour. Cover and refrigerate your wet ingredients.
3) Experiment with single-acting baking powder. Prepare the dough as usual and refrigerate. Bake when needed. Single-acting baking powder isn't supposed to activate until it is heated. Your baked goods may not be as light as they would if you made them the conventional way with double-acting baking powder. I'm also not sure what spoilage concerns surround keeping quick bread batter around for a few days.
Good luck! :)
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Old 08-24-2009, 11:19 AM   #7
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I'm completely baffled here. If you are using baking powder as your leavening agent why on earth would you need to prepare the whole dough? Its extremely simple to just mix all your dry ingredients and store those until you need to add the liquid. Then voila! Quick bread. Your bread will be fresher than if you stored prepared dough in the fridge and will be much quicker.

Perhaps I am misunderstanding but it appears you are trying to make this much more complex than it needs to be.
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Old 08-24-2009, 11:23 AM   #8
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I agree. The concept of injecting a leavening agent is not good science to begin with, and more complicated than mixing up a QUICK bread.
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Old 10-31-2012, 01:54 PM   #9
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co2 in dough

Hi Selkie,
is there a way to inject co2 in dough instead of using yeast?
we want to try this on a wholesale level.
thank you
Ari

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
The normal acid partner to using baking soda is buttermilk, but why you are attempting to do all of those other things...? Gluten formation prevents what you are trying to do. An injection will only make one air pocket.

Well, good luck to you.
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Old 11-02-2012, 01:37 PM   #10
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For a very loose dough/batter (like spongecake) you can just use a whipping cream dispenser (like the one on the picture). Then you can even cook it in the microwave.

Also, this might be interesting: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerated_Bread_Company
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