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Old 10-13-2009, 07:36 AM   #1
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Talking Instead of "cooked through"

Hallo,
here another question about the cooking book i am taking care of:
many time in the book there is this expression "cooked through"
but sounds like a term adapted from German and not really a common english expression,
can you tell me another way to say it?
I put below one of the recipes containing this expression:

Chinese noodles a la Shakti
easy and spicy
  • ½ kg Chinese noodles
  • 3 red bell peppers, quartered and cut in thin slices
  • 700 g tofu, 1 cm cubes
  • 700 g oyster mushrooms, thin slices
  • 3 tbsp ginger, chopped
  • 3 tbsp garlic, chopped
  • 200 g cashew nuts, roasted
  • 3 chillies, finely chopped
  • 1 small bundle parsley, chopped
  • 2 spring onions, rings
  • ca. 200 ml soya sauce
  • ca. 150 ml sherry
  • 3 tbsp curry
  • 3 tbsp oregano
  • 2 tbsp sweet paprika
  • ca. 60 ml sesame oil
  • oil


Spice the tofu with the sweet paprika, the oregano and the curry.
Fry the bell peppers in a pan until cooked through but still with
some “bite”.
Put the peppers in a big mixing pot.
Fry now shortly the garlic and the ginger in oil, then add the mushrooms, when the mushrooms are cooked through, add 75 ml sherry and put everything after a short while into the mixing pot.
Fry one layer of tofu in a pan with oil until it's nicely brown.
Pour about 50 ml of soya sauce over it and stir the tofu until the soya sauce has evaporated.
Repeat procedure with all the tofu.
Add the tofu into the mixing pot.
Add the cashew nuts, the parsley, the chilli and the spring onions in the mixing pot, mix everything well.


Cook the Chinese noodles in salted water, that you have brought to boiling before. Cook them until they are done, strain them and add the noodles in the pot.


Mix everything well with the sesame oil, the rest of the sherry and soya sauce.
That's it, enjoy!

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Old 10-13-2009, 08:49 AM   #2
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Actually, cooked through is a very common term in English recipes. The way you use it would be understandable to most any English speaker.
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Old 10-13-2009, 09:52 AM   #3
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I agree that "cooked through" is understandable to english-speaking cooks, so that's good! For the sake of variety, though, and to answer your question, here are some other words and phrases you could use:

Thoroughly cooked
Fully cooked
Completely cooked

Often cookbooks will describe the color or texture the cook should look for to know that it's done:

Tender (veggies, pasta)
Tender-crisp (veggies that are cooked but still firm)
Al dente (tender but with a firm bite - pasta)
Translucent (onion)
No longer pink (ground beef, the inside of poultry)
Lightly/fully/deeply brown or golden brown
Softened (onion, etc)
Until thickened (sauces)
Until a fork slides in easily (veggies)

Mushrooms are often cooked until they release their moisture

Meats are often cooked to a particular temperature (X degrees) or level of doneness (rare/medium rare/medium/medium well/well done)

Cooking fats are often described as hot/shimmering/just smoking/smoking (oil), melted/bubbling/sizzling (butter)

Nuts and spices are often dry-toasted until fragrant

Likewise garlic, spices, and herbs are sometimes added to dishes and cooked briefly until fragrant

Pasta is often cooked according to package instructions

I'll try to think of some more!
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Old 10-13-2009, 10:55 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apple*tart View Post
I agree that "cooked through" is understandable to english-speaking cooks, so that's good! For the sake of variety, though, and to answer your question, here are some other words and phrases you could use:

Thoroughly cooked
Fully cooked
Completely cooked

Often cookbooks will describe the color or texture the cook should look for to know that it's done:

Tender (veggies, pasta)
Tender-crisp (veggies that are cooked but still firm)
Al dente (tender but with a firm bite - pasta)
Translucent (onion)
No longer pink (ground beef, the inside of poultry)
Lightly/fully/deeply brown or golden brown
Softened (onion, etc)
Until thickened (sauces)
Until a fork slides in easily (veggies)

Mushrooms are often cooked until they release their moisture

Meats are often cooked to a particular temperature (X degrees) or level of doneness (rare/medium rare/medium/medium well/well done)

Cooking fats are often described as hot/shimmering/just smoking/smoking (oil), melted/bubbling/sizzling (butter)

Nuts and spices are often dry-toasted until fragrant

Likewise garlic, spices, and herbs are sometimes added to dishes and cooked briefly until fragrant

Pasta is often cooked according to package instructions

I'll try to think of some more!
Wow apple, thank you very much,
such a variety i really did not know,
that is very useful, thank you!
and about pasta is it ok to use the italian term "al dente"
or about the vegetables to say:
Fry the bell peppers in a pan until cooked through but still with
some “bite”.
ciao
eiasu
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Old 10-13-2009, 10:59 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eiasu View Post
and about pasta is it ok to use the italian term "al dente"
or about the vegetables to say:
Fry the bell peppers in a pan until cooked through but still with
some “bite”.
ciao
eiasu
Yes you can say both of these. Both terms are widely used and understood. There may be some people who do not understand al dente, but most will understand.
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Old 10-13-2009, 11:18 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Yes you can say both of these. Both terms are widely used and understood. There may be some people who do not understand al dente, but most will understand.
Thank you,
that makes things easy,
ciao
eiasu
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Old 10-13-2009, 11:46 AM   #7
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Your Chinese recipe calls for 3 Tablespoons of oregano!
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Old 10-13-2009, 11:50 AM   #8
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Again, I offer to eat all of your test dishes.

In the interest of a well written cook book of course!
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Old 10-13-2009, 12:39 PM   #9
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Yes jennyema , it is a very spicy dish, as described in the sub-title of the dish,
bigdaddy, are you interested in eating only or also in cooking?
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Old 10-13-2009, 02:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eiasu View Post
Yes jennyema , it is a very spicy dish, as described in the sub-title of the dish,
bigdaddy, are you interested in eating only or also in cooking?
eiasu

Oregano isn't spicy. It's very pungent. It's used mostly in Mediterranean and Mexican cusine. I have never heard of it being used in Chinese food.

At any rate, that's a whole lot of oregano.
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