"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-29-2015, 11:28 AM   #11
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Over the rainbow
Posts: 1,272
Redmike and RPC , thanks for the information I understand this a bit better now , at first glance I thought it did refer to Jewish dietary requirements. I can now have a look and maybe see what the equivalent would be here so as not to get it wrong using a recipe that refers to kosher salt , which I can now see would be easy to do . It still doesn't put me off but I did need to understand it more .

Possibly the UK equivalent or near to it is Maldon sea salt or what we call Rock Salt . Terminology of course depends entirely on where you are so what's "correct " in one country doesn't work in another . Of course they are both correct we just use different words . :-)
__________________

__________________
Gravy Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 12:23 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 2,954
Why not just use the terms Coarse sea salt and Fine sea salt in your recipes. Those seem both neutral and pretty clear which type of salt to use.
__________________

__________________
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 12:45 PM   #13
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
Why not just use the terms Coarse sea salt and Fine sea salt in your recipes. Those seem both neutral and pretty clear which type of salt to use.
The real issue among the salts is measurement accuracy. ATK has compared table salt, Morton's and Diamond Crystal kosher salts. Measuring equal volumes (tablespoons, cups, etc.) they found there is twice as much table salt as DC kosher in any measure. There is 1.5 times as much table salt vs. Morton's in a measure.

As a result, it's important to a recipe to specify which salt you are measuring.

Sea salts, being mostly an artisan product, are less standardized than the commercial products mentioned above. You really are in the dark trying to measure them compared to a standard such as DC kosher or table salt.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 12:46 PM   #14
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nazaré, Portugal
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
Why not just use the terms Coarse sea salt and Fine sea salt in your recipes. Those seem both neutral and pretty clear which type of salt to use.
Thanks for the reply.

I have personally never seen fine sea salt in market.

And why sea salt?

Is Kosher salt, sea salt?

Do your see using the phrase, "cause salt" as being a problem?
__________________
redmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 01:03 PM   #15
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
All salt is sea salt. It's just a matter of when the sea water the salt was a part of evaporated.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 01:15 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 2,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by redmike View Post
Do your see using the phrase, "cause salt" as being a problem?
I do not see this as a problem if your fingers would learn to not make typos.

Good explanations coming from several directions from you all.

Coarse salt and fine salt seem to be pretty distinctive and neutral terms.
__________________
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 01:16 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,230
Perhaps a general guideline for of the amount of "course" or "fine" salt with the disclaimer of "To Taste" will fit what you're looking for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Anyone who's put off by the term needs to educated, not accommodated.
I so agree with this statement.








Also a small explanation of the names and differences of salts could find it's way into your book.

The best cookbooks to me are ones that discuss techniques and ingredients and are more then just a collection of recipe's that I'll modify to fit my own desires.
__________________
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 01:26 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nazaré, Portugal
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
All salt is sea salt. It's just a matter of when the sea water the salt was a part of evaporated.
Where does Salt come from?

Please explain how it relates to cooking recipes.
__________________
redmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 01:40 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,049
Quote:
Originally Posted by redmike View Post
Where does Salt come from?

Please explain how it relates to cooking recipes.
As much as possible, salting a dish should be done to taste if the type of food allows it. This is necessitated by exactly what we are discussing - all salt is not created equal, and mixing and matching can result in both under and over seasoning.

For so many dishes, it's really important to taste as you go and adjust seasonings (not only salt) for your preferences, or for what you feel the food should taste like. It's fine to start with a baseline, but in many recipes, that baseline is short of what I feel is necessary.

I find that for most recipes, when I make them for the first time, they come out underseasoned. If it's possible I may taste and add additional quantities of some of the flavorings during cooking. If it isn't possible to do that (like bread or a baked casserole that can't be stirred or tasted once it's in the oven), and if I deem the recipe worth doing again in the future, I will note any needed changes, then incorporate them the next time, and repeat as often as necessary until I get it where I feel it's right.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2015, 01:55 PM   #20
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
Quote:
Originally Posted by redmike View Post
...Is Kosher salt, sea salt?

Do your see using the phrase, "cause salt" as being a problem?
Quote:
Originally Posted by redmike View Post
Where does Salt come from?

Please explain how it relates to cooking recipes.
redmike, you asked if kosher salt was sea salt so you got answers.

I think "coarse salt" is too ambiguous. What's coarse to one person may not be to another.

As RPC said, salting a dish is ultimately a "to taste" exercise. However, when listing salt as an ingredient in certain parts of recipes, a measurement is necessary. That's when an accurate statement is important.

Seasoning to taste is the final step near the end of the recipe. The salt called for in the recipe may be too little or just right. That's when you do some tasting and adjust or not to complete the dish.

Recipes often tell you to adjust the seasonings near the end of a recipe. That doesn't mean salt wasn't added yet. It just means it may not be enough.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
salt

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.