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Old 03-29-2015, 07:18 AM   #1
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Kosher Salt And Halal

A well meaning person suggested that I don't use the term kosher salt in my recipes because it would be similar to using the word halal, and might turn some people off the book.

He said that he's never seen salt labeled kosher salt in the UK

Why Most Recipes Ask for Kosher Salt (and When It's Really Necessary)

So how shall I describe it in my cookbook.

Coarse salt?

Thanks

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Old 03-29-2015, 07:37 AM   #2
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It doesn't put me off a recipe , I just use salt , whats the difference between kosher and coarse salt ? I think if anything the term is a bit confusing ?

If you are writing a book then I presume you want to appeal to a global audience so you could use the term but suggest a sub for it ?
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:45 AM   #3
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Well you have to use half the amount of table salt (fine) as you would kosher salt, coarse.

Hopefully table salt is fine salt everywhere.

Thanks for the reply.
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Old 03-29-2015, 09:17 AM   #4
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Kosher is a convenient term that describes a particular kind of salt. There are fine grain, super-fine grain, and regular table salt. The super-fine is called popcorn salt around here, is that is what it's normally used for. Coarse salt can be in little chunks, like what you get on a pretzel. Kosher salt is like little, flat, flakes of salt, much larger than the granular table salt. So maybe you could call it flake salt.

It is used in Kosher foods to draw blood and moisture from the meat. It's shape makes it perfect for that purpose.

Yep, I think flake salt would work, but you would have to describe it to people. Again, where I live, it would be packaged as Kosher salt.

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Old 03-29-2015, 09:49 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redmike View Post
A well meaning person suggested that I don't use the term kosher salt in my recipes because it would be similar to using the word halal, and might turn some people off the book.

He said that he's never seen salt labeled kosher salt in the UK

Why Most Recipes Ask for Kosher Salt (and When It's Really Necessary)

So how shall I describe it in my cookbook.

Coarse salt?

Thanks
Quote:
Originally Posted by redmike View Post
Well you have to use half the amount of table salt (fine) as you would kosher salt, coarse.

Hopefully table salt is fine salt everywhere.

Thanks for the reply.

You give the reasons for using the correct terminology.

Kosher salt is the standard of use in most professional cooking and for serious home cooks as well. Anyone who's put off by the term needs to educated, not accommodated.
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Old 03-29-2015, 10:36 AM   #6
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I suppose it depends where you are ,its not standard use in the UK hence I had to ask about it . There are lots of different terms used which is why if you want to appeal globally you can't assume everyone will use the term you are familiar with. Although as I said, personally it wouldn't put me off . I belong to different cookery forums so you get used to picking up different terms used , and if you don't know just ask .
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:05 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
You give the reasons for using the correct terminology.

Kosher salt is the standard of use in most professional cooking and for serious home cooks as well. Anyone who's put off by the term needs to educated, not accommodated.
I know and that it was how I had it listed in all my recipes.

I can however imagine somebody not buying a book if it listed Halal meat.

No point in losing potential buyers because they don't understand a term.

But sad that such things have become important.

My friend in the UK said that he has never seen "kosher salt" in a market.
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:09 AM   #8
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The term KOSHER SALT does not mean the salt conforms to Jewish dietary laws. It is simply the style of salt used to remove the blood from the meat during processing because blood is not permitted to be consumed by either Jewish or Muslim dietary laws.
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:15 AM   #9
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The term KOSHER SALT does not mean the salt conforms to Jewish dietary laws. It is simply the style of salt used to remove the blood from the meat during processing because blood is not permitted to be consumed by either Jewish or Muslim dietary laws.
I know and we know but I can understand many people not knowing.

There are growing objections to supermarket in several countries that now sell Halal meat, so I guess there's a growing sensitivity to these things.

I don't have a problem with saying, coarse or sea salt instead of kosher salt.
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Old 03-29-2015, 11:19 AM   #10
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Because kosher salt is more coarse than table salt, it dissolves more slowly. Used right, it can give little bursts of salty flavor without completely permeating the dish. I would probably not use table salt in a crust mixture for a roast or similar food. Kosher salt is often called for in rubs and coatings for that reason. If used in a slowly cooked dish like a stew or soup, it makes no difference (aside from the quantity used) because the cooking period is long enough to allow either type to dissolve completely.

Since it requires about double the volume of kosher salt to provide the same amount of saltiness as table salt, it tends to unnecessarily raise the cost of a dish in which the two are interchangeable.

I always have both on hand. I have natural sea salt too, collected on the Bahamian island we lived on (the most central settlement on the island is just named Salt Pond). The Bahamas first viable export was salt. The first native Americans to visit there from Cuba found large natural evaporation ponds with tons of crystallized salt around the edges. The first trade route that the Bahamas were part of took advantage of the easy to access salt deposits.
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