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Old 01-08-2014, 03:01 PM   #31
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I am not certain a manual vs automatic matters for this. The automatic ones have a stop button, so I suppose they can be semi-manual as well.

As far as I know they all accommodate the 11 inch wide bags (except the hand held tool). I wouldn't get starry eyed over the extra features though, like the marinating bit, or the canisters.

Here are my two biggest issues with my food saver (I am not sure the model, I can find it later).

1) Wet stuff. This is an issue with all channel bag sealers. The gentle and moist settings seem to help, but I still have to hit the stop button before it sucks out all the liquid.

2) Speed. When I am in the groove I can go too fast. After 8-10 straight double ended seals (using a roll not premade bags) I have to start waiting for the machine because it gets too hot and it will make you wait.

I saw one of the very spendy ($400ish) FoodSavers mention 100 seals in a row. That would be nice. I think I would rather go chamber sealer once we get above $150, but I wouldn't want to be soley reliant on a chamber sealer. I sealed two whole geese today and one was a big un.
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Old 01-08-2014, 03:18 PM   #32
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Thanks Frank.
I doubt I would need to concern myself with speed. As the vacuum sealer will be used mainly for storing foods that I bring home in bulk. I would be in no hurry.

If you were to hang the food bag over your counter so the liquids were down in the bag, would that help with the machines sucking up the liquids? Just a guess.

I need to do some checking on this sealer. I want to make sure its generic as far as bags go. I understand these rolls and bags can be quite expensive? Seems rolls would be best for me. I did see some good buys on Amazon for rolls.
Are all the bags and rolls equal? Or is the brand name required?

I am intrigued with the Sous Vide application. Intrigued is the key word. I don't want to spend $200.00 on one to use it a couple times.
But, I do see many dishes that can be made with this technology.
I still do not fully comprehend/get the pictures above with rare meat? Since we were all taught high and fast on stuff like burgers and steaks.

This is very new to me. Sous Vide.
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Old 01-08-2014, 05:25 PM   #33
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The speed issue seems mostly trivial but when you are repackaging something, say wings, and you have 10 or 15 packages you want to get done it is annoying. I had 26 packs of ground meat to package up and the wait was frustrating. It isn't a show stopper, but it doesn't help the cause.

I bought bulk rolls from some place. Addie posted a link and I used them. It was WAY cheaper than buying the FoodSaver brand bags. FoodSaver will tell you their bags are better, and they might be, but they can be very proud of them.

I was intrigued as well. I wasn't going to spend the money. But someone was nice enough to think I might like it for Christmas. I have been enjoying trying things thus far.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:50 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I am intrigued with the Sous Vide application. Intrigued is the key word. I don't want to spend $200.00 on one to use it a couple times.
But, I do see many dishes that can be made with this technology.
If You just want to try sous vide try this. Cook Your Meat in a Beer Cooler: The World's Best (and Cheapest) Sous-Vide Hack | Serious Eats
Its a little more work and the control is not precise but it works.

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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I still do not fully comprehend/get the pictures above with rare meat? Since we were all taught high and fast on stuff like burgers and steaks.
Not everything I have been taught has been correct. Meat cooked for a long time at lower temps is pasteurized.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:43 PM   #35
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The shrimp turned out great. It was firm but not tough. Not at all squishy. It had bite like a natural sausage casing gives a sausage. That snap, but not as pronounced.

They were wonderful and I have some for lunch tomorrow.
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:19 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
If You just want to try sous vide try this. Cook Your Meat in a Beer Cooler: The World's Best (and Cheapest) Sous-Vide Hack | Serious Eats
Its a little more work and the control is not precise but it works.



Not everything I have been taught has been correct. Meat cooked for a long time at lower temps is pasteurized.
Thanks for that link. I'm seriously thinking about trying that.

What temperature does it have to be at to be pasteurized for "low & slow"?
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:20 PM   #37
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So, if I understand correctly, I can leave cooked food in the water bath for a while after it's done. Does that mean I could cook the vegis, lower the temperature and cook a well done steak, lower it some more and cook a rare steak, and I could leave the veg and the first steak while the rare steak was cooking?
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Old 01-08-2014, 11:49 PM   #38
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Yes, you can do that, you may not want to though. Leaving items in too long can also have a negative effect. I read something the other week that stated if you leave items in too long it can turn out bad. I will try to find the test article and post it.
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Old 01-09-2014, 07:17 AM   #39
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So, if I understand correctly, I can leave cooked food in the water bath for a while after it's done. Does that mean I could cook the vegis, lower the temperature and cook a well done steak, lower it some more and cook a rare steak, and I could leave the veg and the first steak while the rare steak was cooking?
You can do that. But after the veggies are do I have found it is best to take them out and put them in an ice batch and put them back in the water bath for a minute just before serving. As to doing an medium well steak then dropping the temp (add cold water) then doing a medium rare steak it works great.
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Old 01-09-2014, 07:28 AM   #40
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Yes, you can do that, you may not want to though. Leaving items in too long can also have a negative effect. I read something the other week that stated if you leave items in too long it can turn out bad. I will try to find the test article and post it.
If cooked to long food can turn to mush.

For long cook times all of the bag should be under water. Where the bag has be contaminated with meat or juices it will grow bacteria. If that part of the bag is not under water you will have bacteria growing in a nice warm wet environment. Then when you take your food out of the bag you will mix it with the bacteria.

a great easy to follow guidie for sous vide can be found here: A Practical Guide to Sous Vide Cooking
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