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Old 01-18-2008, 05:15 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Causal Cook
What is the secret to getting it so dark?
Patience! Patience!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Causal Cook
Also.... how much flour to how much oil in the roux is ideal?
50/50 is what most cookbooks say. I personally don't measure, but I use a little more flour than oil. Maybe 2/3 cup oil to 1 cup flour ratio...maybe more. It's the browned flour that I am looking for in the gumbo, not the oil.

A cast iron skillet is a big plus...but not absolutely necessary!

Pure Peanut oil is my fat of choice for the very dark rouxs.

Have Fun!
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Old 01-18-2008, 06:11 PM   #12
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My neighbor, Mrs. Bordis, sent me over some delicious black gumbo once. Come to find out, it had raccoon meat in it.
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Old 01-19-2008, 06:31 AM   #13
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My neighbor, Mrs. Bordis, sent me over some delicious black gumbo once. Come to find out, it had raccoon meat in it.
You gotta do something with the little buggers...
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Old 01-19-2008, 06:20 PM   #14
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My neighbor, Mrs. Bordis, sent me over some delicious black gumbo once. Come to find out, it had raccoon meat in it.
I have had a few Gumbos in small Louisiana towns that had a hard boiled egg in there as well. I think gumbo is like Bouillabaisse, it is whatever you want to put in it. Bouillabaisse was historically the food of the poorer people in Marsialle etc because it was basically a stew of either day old fish or low grade types of fish. Ironically, it is the signature dish at expensiveFrench restaraunts here in the USA.
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Old 01-19-2008, 07:55 PM   #15
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i'm from louisiana, born & raised on the bayou, and my father makes the darkest but NOT BURNED roux i've ever seen.

there are 2 secrets... (1) low heat, and (2) lots of time. he goes about 45 min to get it to a dark chocolate color, and then, he turns the fire down and watches it very, very closely for about another 15 to 20 min.

there's a VERY FINE LINE to doing this, but remember, if you even burn it slightly, it'll ruin the flavor, and you'll have to start all over again.

btw, the locals make the following gumbos:

seafood - includes shrimp, crawfish tails, crab, oysters.
chicken & sausage - self explanatory
"complete" gumbo - mixture of the two above.
"wild" gumbo - duck & andouille, and i've even tasted some nutria gumbo.
"broke" gumbo - when the $$ is short, you put in boiled eggs, hotdogs, and any other leftovers to a chicken & sausage gumbo.

my mom's biggest secret is to add some smoked turkey meat to her "complete" gumbo. when she does that, the ingredients to feed 15 - 20 people can easily top $175-if you use fresh ingredients.
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Old 01-20-2008, 08:47 AM   #16
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seafood - includes shrimp, crawfish tails, crab, oysters.
chicken & sausage - self explanatory
"complete" gumbo - mixture of the two above.
"wild" gumbo - duck & andouille, and i've even tasted some nutria gumbo.
"broke" gumbo - when the $$ is short, you put in boiled eggs, hotdogs, and any other leftovers to a chicken & sausage gumbo.

my mom's biggest secret is to add some smoked turkey meat to her "complete" gumbo. when she does that, the ingredients to feed 15 - 20 people can easily top $175-if you use fresh ingredients.

Nutria.....it would take a million bucks to get me to eat nutria. I've heard it's not horrible tasting, but getting past the 'giant rat' thing is an obstacle for me. I'll be back in New Orleans in April. Liuzza's by the Track has the best gumbo I've ever tasted, although I wouldn't mind an invitation to your Mom's house....
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Old 03-06-2008, 02:28 AM   #17
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I think the darker roux is the more cajun way, but doesnt mean its the only way. I grew up an hour north of New Orleans and my family has always made a brownish gumbo. It has a little sweeter taste and isnt too bad, I liked it a lot as a child. But now that I make my own I prefer it darker (and spicier), but I dont get too specific, usually about the time when I'm tired of standing there stirring is when its good enough - 45 mins approx.

Also, my fav is to have it with ritz crackers and a glass of milk.
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Old 03-10-2008, 04:03 PM   #18
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I would like a roux sandwich myself - some nice roux on two slices of white bread, s'il vous plait.
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