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Old 01-18-2008, 11:36 AM   #1
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Making Gumbo Black

Hello,

In drives through very rural Lousiana, I noticed that the local gumbos are often pitch black.

What is the secret to getting it so dark? I have tried making the roux darker (almost to burning) and have got the gumbo dark brown, but not pitch black. Any tips will be appreciated.

Also.... how much flour to how much oil in the roux is ideal?

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Old 01-18-2008, 11:58 AM   #2
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I've only made it once, and I followed Paul Prudhomme's recipe from a cookbook I borrowed from a friend. I think it was equal parts oil and flour (most roux is made that way), and the directions said to keep stirring till it didn't darken any more. It was definitely black I didn't know if I had done something wrong and it was for a Cajun-themed dinner party, but everyone seemed to love it
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Old 01-18-2008, 11:59 AM   #3
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use butter for your roux, not oil....and cook it for at least an hour, and probably closer to two.
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Old 01-18-2008, 12:15 PM   #4
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add some Squid Ink.
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Old 01-18-2008, 12:22 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095 View Post
add some Squid Ink.
YT, it's not really the color that's important, but the flavor that the color represents
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Old 01-18-2008, 12:35 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue View Post
use butter for your roux, not oil....
Thanks for that clarification, Vera. It's been a couple of years, so I couldn't remember exactly how I'd made it. I do remember it called for a teaspoon of red pepper flakes - nice and spicy
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Old 01-18-2008, 12:40 PM   #7
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YT, it's not really the color that's important, but the flavor that the color represents
ok, My Bad
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Old 01-18-2008, 04:03 PM   #8
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The key is in your roux, like stated, cook it until it is dark brown, like good dark chocolate. Also the stock can be darker, and the gumbo file will add some more dark tones to it.
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Old 01-18-2008, 04:30 PM   #9
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Thanks for the great suggestions regarding roux cooking time and butter. A cold front jsut moved in and it is definelty gumbo time.

I just remembered another ingredient. A girl from louisiana told me that real roux can only be made in an old cast iron pot. She said that I should haunt the thrift shops until I find the right one.
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Old 01-18-2008, 04:32 PM   #10
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CC, I think Vera advised using butter. You certainly can use oil, and many folks do, although I prefer and always use butter. And the longer you cook it the darker it gets.

The formula is eaual volumes of fat and flour. You don't have to too scientific in the measurement.

And I am with GG, it is the taste that counts. Although different colors of roux have different tastes.

Good luck.
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