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Old 02-16-2012, 07:44 PM   #1
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Marinated steak: Wipe off marinade before cooking?

This is probably a silly question from an amateur chef like me who has probably been contributing to beef mortality rates for many decades with just my home cooking alone.

Tonight I'm marinating my ribeye steak in a couple cloves of minced garlic (pressed with my Zyliss garlic press), a splash of EVOO and a splash of Trader Joe's balsamic vinegar.

I'm going to pan fry my steak. (And yes I will turn it only once.)

I've never thought of this before. I always just go straight from marinade to pan. It steams and spits and smokes a lot.

I'm wondering if that's the best way to go. Maybe I should wipe it off slightly with a paper towel, not to totally scour the marinade off but just to remove the most liquid parts. There's still be a bit of marinade moisture since I'm not going to be a zealot about it, but I'm thinking of removing most of the marinade before I cook it.

Then I intend to give it a light sprinkling of coarse salt just before I toss it on the pan. Or sometimes I just throw my sea salt in the pan and then throw the steak on top of it, and sprinkle the top side a bit more to prepare it for turning. (The pan will of course be cooking hot before I throw the steak on.)

What is your advice? I'm marinating right now and I know forums aren't the place to get a 30 minute answer but DC is pretty active and DC is pretty active this time of day (US EST-PST dinner time) and I'll be pleased to get some advice before I commit.

Or I'll do it and tell you how it came out. Even an old dog (me) can learn new tricks. Particularly if food rewards are involved.

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Old 02-16-2012, 08:07 PM   #2
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Meat to be seared in a pan should always be dry. You'll get a better crust and avoid all that sputtering.

Also, the garlic will burn in high heat and become bitter.

So, blot it dry with paper towels and brush off the garlic before hitting the hot pan.
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:24 PM   #3
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Thank you so much Andy! I've had Internet connection problems most of the last 40 minutes and just now was able to access your reply. You seem to support my logic. I'll do that.

As a follow up, dry pan or apply a little oil? (I think I'll try dry, ETA about 20 minutes or so, 6 PM PST as point of no return....)

(I hate my flaky Internet connection.)
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:27 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Thank you so much Andy! I've had Internet connection problems most of the last 40 minutes and just now was able to access your reply. You seem to support my logic. I'll do that.

As a follow up, dry pan or apply a little oil? (I think I'll try dry, ETA about 20 minutes or so, 6 PM PST as point of no return....)

(I hate my flaky Internet connection.)
A light coating of oil.
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Old 02-16-2012, 09:49 PM   #5
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How did it turn out?

I prefer to grease the pan with a chunk of fat cut off the steak.
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Old 02-16-2012, 10:12 PM   #6
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It turned out better. I did everything I said and got Andy's advice before or while I was cooking, just a light coating of oil on the skillet.

Unfortunately I was typing and fussing with my unreliable Internet connection and forgot about my steak for a few important moments, and burned the first side. I cut most of that off while eating.

There's a topic for this. Perhaps I'll post there. But anyway this was a good way to cook a steak. If only you don't try to communicate on the forum or maybe turn off your computer. My bad.
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Old 02-17-2012, 08:48 AM   #7
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I prefer to grease the pan with a chunk of fat cut off the steak

Although it seems to have fallen out of favor, Taxlady, cookbooks from the 18th and early 19th centuries often specify using rendered beef fat for frying.

It only makes sense that if you use fat from the animal you're frying that you'd intensify the flavor. Nice to know there are folks who continue that tradition.
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Old 02-17-2012, 09:00 AM   #8
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HF the tradition is alive and well in Yorkshire Fish and Chip shops.
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Old 02-17-2012, 11:46 AM   #9
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I like the idea of greasing the pan with a piece of fat.
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Old 02-17-2012, 11:48 AM   #10
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Beef fat has a low smoke point so you could be facing a smoky kitchen if you pan fry steaks at a high temp as is recommended.
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