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Old 10-01-2018, 02:59 PM   #11
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Actually, when baking using ratios, it's all by weight, even the liquids.
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Old 10-01-2018, 03:24 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Fabulous resource! Thanks!
Great resource. Comprensive. Much obliged!
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Old 10-01-2018, 03:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
<<When a recipe calls for four ml of balsamic vinegar, can I assume that 4 grams is more or less equivalent, or should I google “milliliters to grams; vinegar.”>>

No, you reach for the (metric) measuring jug or the relevant sized spoon.

(There isn't the faint chance that you might just be teasing us with this thread, is there?)
No chance at all! But I can see where you might think that.
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Old 10-09-2018, 10:24 AM   #14
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If a recipe calls for liquid measures by volume, then that's what I use. Unlike most dry ingredients, liquids can't be packed tightly or loosely to change the actual mass of the substance within a container. One cup (8 fluid ounces) of water will always be the same weight, while while the weight of a cup of flour can vary significantly. (actually changes in humidity can change the weight of flour too, so there is that to consider. I live in a semi arid climate on the Colorado prairie, so I don't have to deal with that.)

I have several bread recipes that specify by weight only the major dry ingredients. Smaller quantities of dry (yeast and salt most typically) and all liquids are by volume. I have others which specify the flour and water by weight, but still do teaspoons and tablespoons for smaller quantities of salt or sugar or herbs or other flavorings. The most critical ratio in baking is typically the hydration of the main dry ingredients, and for a home cook, those are the only ones that really need to be weighed.

Cooks have been baking bread for a really long time, since long before anybody thought that weighing, or even measuring was needed. For may centuries it was done by learning how the dough is supposed to look and feel when you are working it, and that mostly came from training and experience. It's still a good measure, and many bread recipes still specify dough as "wet" or "elastic" or "just until the bowl cleans" - terms which do rely on some experience, or maybe when starting out, just a guesstimate and a prayer.
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