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Old 09-29-2018, 12:43 PM   #1
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Metric liquid measures

It is stresses by food writers and chefs that weighing ingredients is so very important, especially in baking (even though in their own recipes they will, more often than not, use volume measurements). I like weighing my ingredients when baking. It insures consistent results and fewer disasters. And when I do weigh, I use metric, just because the math is easier.

Iím confused though. Why do recipes that include metric weights tend to give liquid amounts in milliliters? Arenít milliliters and liters volume measurements? A liter of milk is sure to weigh less than a liter of heavy cream and more than a liter of water. Is this the same as say, a bread recipe that measures the dry ingredients in ounces but allows for volume measurements for the ingredients that are relatively small?

If Iím weighing my ingredients, I like to weigh them all, down to the two teaspoons of salt and the tablespoon of honey. When a recipe expresses these scant but important ingredients by volume, I convert the measurements to weight, especially if Iím doubling or halving the recipe.

When a recipe calls for four ml of balsamic vinegar, can I assume that 4 grams is more or less equivalent, or should I google ďmilliliters to grams; vinegar.Ē

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Old 09-29-2018, 08:27 PM   #2
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Usually, a measurement of a liquid in metric is in terms of liters, but smaller amounts can be of size cubed, such as cubic centimeters.

It is flexible due to the scale of things that are measured, plus temperatures, pressures, and so on.
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Old 09-30-2018, 12:38 PM   #3
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Most packaged dry goods are sold by weight and liquids by volume, regardless of metric or standard. Perhaps that has something to do with it...?
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Old 10-01-2018, 10:59 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
Iím confused though. Why do recipes that include metric weights tend to give liquid amounts in milliliters? Arenít milliliters and liters volume measurements?
Yes. Solids are measured by weight. Liquids are measured by volume. So your recipe makes prefect sense.

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A liter of milk is sure to weigh less than a liter of heavy cream Ē
Actually, you have that backwards. Fat is lighter than water.

But your point good.
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Old 10-01-2018, 11:36 AM   #5
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Print this out and tape it to the inside of your cupboard.

http://www.moderndomestic.com/2011/0...dient-weights/
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Old 10-01-2018, 11:39 AM   #6
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Print this out and tape it to the inside of your cupboard.

Baking Math: Common Baking Ingredient Weights | ModernDomestic

Fabulous resource! Thanks!
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Old 10-01-2018, 11:51 AM   #7
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Fabulous resource! Thanks!
You're welcome
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Old 10-01-2018, 12:16 PM   #8
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Over here we always cook in metric measures and never (well, very rarely) in cups.

The secret with anything liquid - water, wine, milk, cream, etc.- is to use a measuring jug made for liquids. You don't weigh liquids. Don't worry about converting metric liquids to cup measurements. If you are dealing with dry ingredients or solid fats, etc., you weigh those (sometimes melted butter is give in measuring spoonsful but don't let that worry you)

In the "old" days over here recipes were written in ounces so a recipe might say 8 ounces of flour, butter or sugar but 4 fluid ounces of water, milk, etc., Fluid ounces being fractionally different to dry ounces but it didn't matter because the jugs for measuring the liquids took this into account. If melted, butter or other fats are often measured as liquids but if solid (and that includes soft fats) they were weighed on scales. Nowadays we still do the same but with new recipes the measuring is in metric units.


**If the recipe you are using is a British one and it asks for a pint or a half or a quarter of a pint please remember that an Imperial (ie British )pint is 20 fluid ounces whereas a US pint is still 16 ounces.**

Baking with weighed ingredients is a great way of practising basic maths with young children.

It's that saying again - "Two countries divided by a common language"!
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Old 10-01-2018, 12:38 PM   #9
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<<When a recipe calls for four ml of balsamic vinegar, can I assume that 4 grams is more or less equivalent, or should I google “milliliters to grams; vinegar.”>>

No, you reach for the (metric) measuring jug or the relevant sized spoon.

(There isn't the faint chance that you might just be teasing us with this thread, is there?)
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Old 10-01-2018, 03:51 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Print this out and tape it to the inside of your cupboard.

Baking Math: Common Baking Ingredient Weights | ModernDomestic
Thank you. I have bookmarked it.

Here's another one. It's laid out a little differently and has rolled oats. Good to have them both.
Cup to Gram Conversions Dish | Allrecipes
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