"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-05-2007, 03:07 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 31
Minced meat frying

Do not is this is the right forum...

Well when you form minced meat to a steak like in burgers. I have heard that it must not be red inside at all. But I say that it does not have to be completely cooked? So am I right or what? Or what is the right approach?

__________________

__________________
lo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2007, 03:49 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
If you mean gound beef when you say minced...formed into a burger patty. I think they say an internal temp. of 155* is the safe zone...I could be wrong but somewhere in that neighborhood...

Hope this helps...
__________________

__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2007, 08:20 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Color doesn't mean as much as the internal temp at the center of the meat, as Uncle Bob noted. For ground (minced) beef - it should be 160ºF/71ºC. Cooking "to color" can lead to being either undercooked (even if not pink), or overcooked.

These are food safety guidelines designed to kill any potential bacteria that could cause food poisoning - in ground/minced meat that is most commonly E. Coli contamination. This is mandatory in restaurants here in the US - only a strong suggestion for cooking at home - nobody can force you to follow the rules at home.

Of course, if you grind/mince your own beef at home - there is a way to do it where 145ºF/63ºC would be considered safe. As I get older I find I'm less likely to take chances with pre-ground meat and grind my own when I want that juicy rare burger.

To answer your question of does it have to be fully cooked ... the answer is it depends on how lucky your feel. If it is, you're safe, if not you're taking a chance.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2007, 08:27 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
where does your meat come from? who has handled it? How many times? what is it's quality? etc...how long has it been since it was ground (minced) all play a part in the answer to the question. If you like rare hamburgers, go to a Kosher or Halal market where meat is handled alomst sacredly and you should be ok. Otherwise get your own sirloin and grind your own. Or make minced steak with onions and gravy and go for well done.

When you grind meat you are grinding all that bacteria from the outside of the meat all through the product.
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2007, 08:41 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Michael...

I was under the impression(maybe falsely so) that "home ground" burger would carry the same risk for E. coli as would "store bought" burger. Since E. coli (if it is present) would be found on the outside of the meat being ground. So whether ground at home or in a commercial market inevitably some of the bacteria would wind up inside the grind. Is there something I can do prior to grinding at home that would lower the chance of contaminatioin?

Thanks in Advance for you help!!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 12:10 AM   #6
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Uncle Bob - you notice I said there was a way ... but I didn't elaborate.

This only works if you don't go sticking forks, knives, or meat hooks into your raw hunk-o-cow, which will only serve to push any surface bacteria into the interior of the meat.

Bring a pot of water to a full rolling boil ... add the meat ... allow to return to a full boil for 30-60 seconds. Remove the meat, dry the surface, and then cut and grind (using meticulously clean cutting board, knives, and meat grinding equipment). This kills the surface bacteria, and although the surface (1-2 mm) is partially cooked it is mixed into the mass of the meat and you'll not notice it. This let's you cook a moister "safe burger" at 145F.

You are right, like usual UB - the bacteria is confined to the surface, unless it's poked in some way.

Truth is ... and I'll NEVER admit that I said this ... the greatest chance of E. Coli contamination comes from ground meat from large processors. I've never had a second thought about grinding my own at home (without the bacteria killing boiling bath) ... or if I known it is ground fresh by my butcher. I cook it rare ... and even eat bites of it raw (a bad habit I've had for about 46 years - since I started cooking unsupervised at the age of 12)! That doesn't mean that what I do is safe or healthy. And, if I'm making burgers for anyone else - they get fully cooked.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 05:09 AM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
I would not have any problem grinding my own meat and cooking a burger rare. I believe that if a restaurant grinds its own meat it can do that also. As Michael said, it is all in knowing the source of your meat.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 05:43 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
lulu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: England
Posts: 2,039
That's basically the rule of thumb I use....if it was bought as steak and ground right there and then at home for cooking rare is fine but bought mince, or mince that has been home ground but left should be cooked through.
__________________
In omnibus amor et iustum
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 07:43 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Michael...

You da Man!!!
I did notice that you did not elaborate..

Thanks for sharing the "hot water bath" idea...It makes perfectly good sense when you think about it...In the past, I have given the meat a "under running water bath" at the sink just for general cleaning...Not really worrying about E. coli as I prefer my burgers more in the 155*/160* range anyway. But for those of you who like them a little bit on the rare side..your method is a slam dunk for home-ground burger.

Thanks again for the great information!!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2007, 08:56 AM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: everett, ma
Posts: 225
Send a message via AIM to tsi88kid
Wouldn't cooking it medium rare or medium ease your minds a little more if you are worried about E Coli?
__________________

__________________
Cook for love and passion not for money
tsi88kid is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.