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Old 09-02-2010, 01:44 PM   #1
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Partly baked bread

I do not know what I call 'partly baked bread' is called (didn't exist to my knowledge when I lived in the US), but I buy it at the supermarket and love the convenience in addition to having freshly baked bread. The variety is limited. I'd like to make my own, perhaps even to freeze it? Instructions please, from anyone in the know.

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Old 09-16-2010, 04:09 PM   #2
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Partially baked bread--say for pizza crust or pasties, is baking until it is 'almost done', then freezing and putting it in the oven to finish browning.

It's just a regular recipe parbaked. Pizza crust is made from a flour/water recipe, while pasties are made from more of a pie crust recipe.

Hope that helps.
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Old 09-17-2010, 01:35 AM   #3
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Thanks, Bliss, for this tip, but it doesn't really solve my problem. I can buy various varieties of partially-baked yeast-risen breads at the supermarket. The loaves are packaged in low-oxygen sealed plastic bags and kept on the shelves at room temperature. You finish baking it in a hot oven for 6 to 10 minutes, depending on kind and size. As I would like to do this with my own breads, I'm looking for information on how long and at what temperature I should bake it partially, then (lacking know-how and facilities for low O2 packaging) refrigerate or freeze for later finishing.
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Old 09-17-2010, 03:00 AM   #4
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Hmm.. I've never partially baked bread so I'm not sure how I would tackle that.
But when I was working, I used to make the bread dough, allow it to complete the first proof, punch it down, shape it into loaves or rolls, wrap in clingwrap and then freeze it.
Unless it promised to be a blisteringly hot day, I would take some frozen dough out in the morning before I left for work and allow it to prove all day. Then bake it in the evening. I found this worked really well and we always had lovely fresh, crusty loaves and rolls.
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Old 09-30-2010, 03:44 PM   #5
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Obala, wish I could have helped more.
I searched for parbaked and prebaked.
This website has instructions for parbaked rolls--quite a way down the page.
Easy Homemade Dinner Rolls ~ Recipes by Amanda's Cookin

Here is a link about oxygen absorbers.
https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/packing_your_own_food_storage/oxygen_absorbers_and_long_term_food_storage.htmhttps://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/packing_your_own_food_storage/oxygen_absorbers_and_long_term_food_storage.htm

I don't think I'd bother with the O2 absorbers, more likely I'd just wrap them in plastic. Good Luck
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Old 10-04-2010, 07:42 AM   #6
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Smile parbaked bread

Great info, blissful! I'll follow it up. Should have realized that par-baked was the correct term. Thanks so much for taking so much trouble to help me.
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Old 10-04-2010, 09:25 AM   #7
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Obala, it was interesting to me too.
I don't know that parbaked is more common than prebaked as a term, just something that I thought of.
You are welcome, glad if that helped.
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