"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-26-2005, 12:07 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Australia
Posts: 148
Thanks Michael. I'm so pleased to have that cleared up. Silly me had illusions that it may have been an American brand of pepper!!!!
__________________

__________________
aussie girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2005, 07:57 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Heat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Central Florida, USA
Posts: 390
Send a message via Yahoo to Heat
Smile Thanks Aussie Girl!

For asking that question! I too was wondering what that meant! I was looking for the answer when i ran across your question! Hahahahaha. How ironic. Thanks Michael! Your very knowledgeable. I'll have to pick your brain more often!! hahahahah
__________________

__________________
"There is no fear in love;
but perfect love casteth out fear"
-The Bible
Heat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2005, 11:30 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
"half n half"

Heavy cream (such as whipping cream) is about 36% fat. Half-n-half is half that, about 18%. Whole Milk is about 4%. Sweet Butter (unsalted) is about 80% fat. Margarine, also, is about 80% fat and 20% water.

SUBSTITUTIONS: Sometimes you can, sometimes you can't. For example, butter and margarine have the same fat and water content, but you can't make a beurre blanc with margarine because it lacks the proteins in butter (which act as emulsifiers). Also, if you want to make a "pan sauce" from the deglazed fond in the pan with some "liquid" like water or wine and some butter - it has to be butter to get the "creamy" texture .. margarine just gives you an "oil slick" - unless you want to throw in an egg yolk to act as the emulsifier. Although, you could use 1/4 - 1/2 the "liquid" and use heavy cream and wind up with something similar as far as texture and "mouth feel".

Sometimes - you can substitute. I've got a recipe from my Grandmother for a chocolate sheet cake ... and replaced her "oleo margarine" with butter flavored Crisco and it's moister, doesn't dry out as quickly, and has a better butter "flavor". I normally don't mess with Grandma's recipes .. but I spent a good month researching before I monkeyed with this one.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 02:47 PM   #14
Cook
 
Chef Wil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Washington California
Posts: 62
Send a message via MSN to Chef Wil Send a message via Yahoo to Chef Wil
Crisco butter flavor is almost the same as the old 'oleo' from the 60's and before, just whip some water and salt into it and there you go.
__________________
Chef Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2005, 02:40 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,277
The USDA actually regulates the amounts of butterfat in dairy products.

European counterparts often are higher in fat than whan we have here.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2005, 11:42 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Wil
Crisco butter flavor is almost the same as the old 'oleo' from the 60's and before, just whip some water and salt into it and there you go.
Yep, that's what I did ... 1 cup Crisco + 6 Tablespoons water to = 1 cup Butter/Oleo.

This was one of my "experiments" that turned out okay. It reduced the saturated fat by 50%, increased the butter "flavor", made the cake moister and it stayed moister for longer (Grandma's recipe began to get noticeably dryer after 3 days and this was still moist after 6).
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2005, 10:06 AM   #17
Head Chef
 
mrsmac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 1,645
While we aussies are asking questions what is powdered sugar? (is it like icing sugar) and is all purpose flour plain flour or self raising?
__________________
mrsmac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2005, 10:15 AM   #18
Head Chef
 
callie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsmac
While we aussies are asking questions what is powdered sugar? (is it like icing sugar) and is all purpose flour plain flour or self raising?
Yes, you're right - powdered sugar is icing sugar (also called confectioner's sugar). All purpose flour is plain flour.
__________________
Practice random acts of kindness.

callie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2005, 11:31 AM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: USA,Colorado
Posts: 358
Here are some others that I've found (Brits & Aussies speak the same English )

Caster sugar = bakers sugar,
Coriander Leaf = Cilantro
Aubergine = Eggplant
Courgette = zucchini
orange/blackcurrant/lemon squash = not invented in USA yet (at least, not in the west...)
Double cream = heavy cream
Spring Onion = Green onion/Salad onion

For a complete listing of synonyms and substitutions for all sorts of ingredients, check out http://www.foodsubs.com

Paint.
__________________
British ex-pat living in Colorado, USA
Paint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2005, 11:35 AM   #20
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
The one that got me wondering on a post for a while was this one:
Capiscum=bell pepper (!)
__________________

__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

« Gourmet | Fond »
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.