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Old 05-31-2008, 07:02 PM   #1
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Pot Roast- adjust time or temp for larger piece?

Hi- I have a recipe for a 2 lb blade cut chuck roast roast and I used a 2.84 lb beef round tip roast (tip off). It is supposed to cook in the oven for 3- 3 1/2 hours, stand 1/2 hour after browning at 190-200 degrees. I have it at 200 degrees. Should I increase the temp and/ or the time? Thanks

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Old 05-31-2008, 07:18 PM   #2
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I would increase just the time and check it for tenderness/doneness after 3 1/2 - 4 hours.

You could also increase the temperature and it would cook faster. I usually cook pot roast at 300F to 350F.
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Old 05-31-2008, 07:30 PM   #3
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Thanks for the quick reply- it's been in the oven for an hour!
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Old 06-01-2008, 09:04 AM   #4
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I usually do that.

But for the most part, I wait about 2-1/2 to 3 hours before I check it, and I most often like to do mine on the stovetop and in a large heavy cast iron Dutch Oven.
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Old 06-14-2008, 10:08 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by jan-kennedy View Post
Hi- I have a recipe for a 2 lb blade cut chuck roast roast and I used a 2.84 lb beef round tip roast (tip off). It is supposed to cook in the oven for 3- 3 1/2 hours, stand 1/2 hour after browning at 190-200 degrees. I have it at 200 degrees. Should I increase the temp and/ or the time? Thanks
Hi Jan,
For a pot roast, increase the cooking time and not the temperature - 200F is too hot IMHO.

1`m with Andy re. the cooking temperature 300 - 350 F, which is equivalent to 150 - 180C, and I would go for - lower for longer.

The browned cut of meat (browned in a mix of OO/EVOO and butter) should be placed on a bed of browned vegetables (browned using the same pan as that which one uses to brown the meat) like onions, carrots, celery, garlic - liquid added, plus seasonings and then covered and cooked. For beef, I would add some parsley stalks, a sprig or rosemary, thyme, blade of mace, a couple of cloves and if using beef, a spoon of jam (yes I know it sounds odd but it works). Cover and cook in the oven at 300F/150C until the meat is tender.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
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Old 06-16-2008, 11:30 AM   #6
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Hi Jan,
For a pot roast, increase the cooking time and not the temperature - 200F is too hot IMHO.
I'd increase the time, as well, but 200F is absolutely NOT too hot. In fact, it is at the very low end of safe cooking temperatures. IMO it's too low.

I cook pot roast somewhere between 275 and 325.
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Old 06-16-2008, 12:53 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I'd increase the time, as well, but 200F is absolutely NOT too hot. In fact, it is at the very low end of safe cooking temperatures. IMO it's too low.

I cook pot roast somewhere between 275 and 325.
I have a feeling they typed "F" instead of "C" by mistake.
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Old 06-16-2008, 01:31 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I'd increase the time, as well, but 200F is absolutely NOT too hot. In fact, it is at the very low end of safe cooking temperatures. IMO it's too low.

I cook pot roast somewhere between 275 and 325.

I agree with you jennyema, 200 is definitely bordering on unsafe. I do pot roast with potatoes and carrots at 325 for a couple of hours and it falls apart it's so tender. I brown it to a nice deep brown crust then into the roaster with water and a few other ingredients for the gravy. The gravy is awesome.
Keep it covered and keep the temp above 300 at all times. I have an electric oven.
I have also done this with a crock pot, browning it well first. High temp for 2 hours, low temp for 3 hours.
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Old 06-16-2008, 07:47 PM   #9
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Hi All,
It was only when I got a reply, specifically Jennyema`s that I thought - what temperature are we talking about here? Is it degrees centigade or degrees Fahrenheit?

Now, as I understand it, pot-roasting is a method of cooking less tender joints /cuts of meat (especially beef and venison) on a bed of vegetables in a sealed/covered pot with a small amount of liquid and cooked for a in a low/moderate oven for sufficient time to render them "melt in the mouth". the cut of meat should be browned and removed from the pan. Brown in OO and butter or dripping and OO. Set the beef to one side. Add more fat if necessary and brown sliced onions, carrots (washed and peeled), sliced celery and gently brown in the fat. Place the meat on top of the vegetables and add wine/stock to come just above the level of the vegetables. Add a bayleaf or two (depends how many you`re cooking for) a couple of peppercorns and other spices such as a blade of mace a few peppercorns or a star anise, etc., cover and cook in a slow oven to moderate oven - no more than 350F/180C/?Gas Mark 4 is the equivalent in the UK or slow oven say 290F/143C/Gas mark 1 according to "Mastering the Art of Cooking". Check the pot whilst cooking to make sure it does not dry out and add extra stock if needed. The strained juices can be used to make a sauce and thickened if neccessary by adding slaked cornflour mixed with a little water to which you add a little of the hot stock (stir well) before returning to the pan to thicken by boiling for 3 minutes. If the sauce is lacking depth, add a dash of Worcestershire sauce or bitter (add touch of sugar or redcurrant jelly for lamb/venison). Season before serving with salt and freshly grated black pepper. Alternatively, use a slow cooker for less tender cuts/joints.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
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Old 06-16-2008, 08:42 PM   #10
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Yea, I think we are mixing our C's and F's, LOL.

Something like that I like to go at 300F, I like low and slow so to speak. I am thinking about it, but I think the only thing I go as low as 200F or even 250F is something I will 'finish off' on the stove top or grill on high heat, like baby back ribs. I let them go for 250F for 4 to 6 hours minimum then finish off on the grill with BBQ sauce.
I did do a roast that way once, turned out great, but now I know you can just sear it then slow cook it to finish it and that works even better that way around.
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