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Old 07-03-2005, 07:41 AM   #11
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Gee, aj, you must have been hanging around when Mom (now 71) taught me to freeze. The straw trick is one she used a lot, and we always did the freezing containers thing. I mean, once the (soup, stew, sauce) is frozen, you can save space by popping it out. I now have a half dozen servings of harissa, several curries, some lentil soup, etc, in the freezer using these methods and they really work and are really space savers in the freezer. Eventually tomato season will come upon us, and I have a bumper crop coming up. I will use both methods (I freeze some as just tomatoes and some as sauce, I don't "do" canning).

Once upon a time I had a small chest freezer that I thought I'd never do without. Some day someone here will offer me the results of their hunting expidition, and I WILL go down and buy a little freezer. But I'm amazed at what I can fit into the small top-of-the-fridge freezer I have!
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Old 07-03-2005, 10:27 AM   #12
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We like to put our meat in a ziplock first...sucking all the air out as mentioned above...and then in foil. The foil makes a big difference. I found a t-bone from 2001 in my freezer a couple of weeks ago, and it had no freezer burn or funky smell at all.

That's the thing about a chest freezer...you have to stand on your head to get to the bottom. I have a friend who freezes water in gallon jugs and keeps in the bottom simply because he never uses the stuff down there anyway, and if the power goes out, he has a big ice chest.
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Old 07-04-2005, 06:53 AM   #13
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Isn't that the truth! But luckily I'm tall, so can reach the bottom. The main reason we bought chest freezers (me and my mom before me) was that they often wound up "living" in a bedroom (we moved every few years). With a chest style freezer you could throw a pretty table cloth on it and pretend you didn't have a major kitchen appliance in your bedroom!
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Old 07-04-2005, 11:44 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
....That's the thing about a chest freezer...you have to stand on your head to get to the bottom. I have a friend who freezes water in gallon jugs and keeps in the bottom simply because he never uses the stuff down there anyway, and if the power goes out, he has a big ice chest.
Just an aside about the inconvenience of a chest freezer... I saw a nifty little chest freezer at Sears that has the typical lid on top, but has a pull-out drawer on the bottom. That would be very convenient. You can find it on their appliance web page. If I didn't already have 2 refrigerators, I would buy one of those.

I recently read that stand alone-freezers are much better for long term storage of food. But my refrigerator/freezers seem to do a good job for me, but I use things frequently.
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Old 07-04-2005, 01:42 PM   #15
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Freezers

The uprights are so pricey - but we recently moved to a middle-of-nowhere community and lucked into a used nice-sized upright. Now we can even put the dog food in there. It sits in a lower-level storage area and when we need something out of it, we call it "going to the store." Can you tell me miss really being able to run down the street to the store? But what we run out of the most are good old non-freezable onions. Boy, can you start craving sliced/diced/minced/chopped onions when they're not there.
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Old 07-05-2005, 06:50 AM   #16
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BTW, freezing those pop and other bottles that you put on the bottom? When I lived in HI and FL, in the spring I'd start filling all unused freezer space with any extra container of water. #1--it keeps your frozen food longer when the electricity goes. #2--you have a good supply of potable water if the water goes. I haven't had water go more than 48 hours, but have done without electricity for a couple of weeks a couple of times, and for a few days OFTEN. Made it so that I didn't have to cook everything pronto. So, for those of you who live in areas prone to natural disaster, fill those empty bottles and fill up the extra space in your freezer.
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Old 07-05-2005, 07:49 AM   #17
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That's a good idea Claire.

Barbara
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Old 07-05-2005, 09:42 AM   #18
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I agree, putting bottles of water in the unused space of the freezer is a great idea. I live on the west coast of Florida, so we're under the threat of hurricanes all summer long. We also get frequent power outages during storms. This has saved more than one freezer load of food!

Another use I find for the frozen bottles, is when I go to more than one store for groceries, I can take a frozen bottle or two and put it in the bottom of a small chest in the trunk of my car, and place my meat & cold items in there for a short term. We have such high temperatures here, it gets like an oven in the trunk. This really helps. When I get home, I pop the bottles back in the freezer for next time. No messy melted ice cubes to deal with.
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Old 07-14-2005, 06:15 PM   #19
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As for the chest vs upright freezer question ... a little simple science helps. Cold air falls, hot air rises. In an upright freezer, or a freezer compartment over a refrigerator that has a side opening door, when you open the door the cold air literallly "falls out". Same thing happens with a refrigerator door. Ever notice your toes get cold when you are rummaging around at night in your bare feet and jammies looking for a midnight snack? It's the cold air falling out of the frige! With a top-opening chest type freezer, or to a lesser extent one with a front opening door and a pull-out drawer - the cold air stays in.
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