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Old 08-31-2007, 03:18 PM   #1
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Previously Frozen?

I have two huge slabs of pork ribs I took out to defrost. Initially I was going to ask if it's okay to defrost them on the kitchen counter (as my fridge is so full), then I noticed the butcher paper said 'previously frozen.' What does previously frozen mean, and will it be okay to defrost on the counter? I always defrost in the fridge. Thanks in advance.

P.S. My grocery order was delivered, so I didn't notice the PF on the label - just threw it in the freezer.

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Old 08-31-2007, 03:23 PM   #2
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Hello Amy

As far as I know, if something is frozen, it cannot be safely refrozen.
So whether it is safe at all to defrost and then cook and eat would depend on whether it was still frozen when u put it in your freezer. If it wasnt, it may not be OK to eat it.

As for defrosting on the counter, I dont know if this is OK or not.

Mel
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Old 08-31-2007, 03:29 PM   #3
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Previously Frozen means just that, it was frozen once before (probably shortly after being butchered) and was then thawed for sale and presentation. According to the USDA, you can refreeze previously frozen meats if they have been handled properly.

As for thawing, it is not safe to thaw on your kitchen counter. It is recommended that you thaw in the fridge or in cold water, and change the water every 30 minutes.

I have thawed small cuts of meat many times before on the counter with no adverse affects. I also allow refrigerated steaks and other cuts of meat to come to room temp by setting them out on the counter for 30 minutes before cooking. I’ve never had a problem.......but it is not recommended by the USDA. And as they say, you can drive 100 years without seatbelt and never have an accident, but that doesn’t make it safe.

So, I’d suggest to be completely safe, thaw it in water if you want to speed up the process. Otherwise, thaw in the fridge.
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Old 08-31-2007, 04:02 PM   #4
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Isn't it a wonder that we aren't all dead?

I thaw in water these days. What would take hours takes
much much less time. Since all my frozens get sealed in my
Food sealer or ziploc bags, it is quite convenient too.
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Old 08-31-2007, 05:35 PM   #5
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I normally thaw on the counter, as long as I am going to be there to determine when it is thawed. If I am going to be away, or if it's something like a 27 pound turkey that is going to take several days, then I thaw in the refrigerator.

But then, as many here have pointed out, I AM dangerous! I'm also still very much alive, extremely healthy as a matter of fact, and the 2 times I have had food poisoning, it was after eating in a restaurant. Oh, and as far as seat belts go, my first 7 or 8 cars didn't even come with seat belts. Not wearing a seat belt only became unhealthy recently.
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Old 08-31-2007, 05:38 PM   #6
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Miss Amy...

If you have what I think you described, 2 slabs of spare ribs frozen solid together in cryovac then take them out of the packaging and lay them on your counter for 30 minutes or an hour to start the thawing process. This will not hurt anything. When they show the first signs of thawing, then go to the refrigerator. Take them out of the refrigerator 30 minutes to one hour before cooking. If you can pry them apart before going to the fridge, that would be good. If you have two seperate slabs then use the same method.

Have Fun & Enjoy!
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Old 08-31-2007, 06:09 PM   #7
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I thaw smaller packages on the counter, but I keep my house very cool. If it's something I'm not going to use right away, I start it out on the counter, then let it finish in the fridge.
Whole chickens go in a bowl of water in the sink, as do shrimp and fish.
Larger things, like a whole turkey, go into a cooler and water to thaw. If the weather is chilly but not freezing, as it usually is around Thanksgiving, we set the cooler in the garage and don't worry about the water until we bring it in to finish it off.

As for your ribs, if they're the vacuum packed ones, I think they'll be fine as long as they stayed cold until you got them. It really depends on how much you trust your grocer. Does the store have a butcher? If it does, I'd call and ask him. He should be an expert on the subject.
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Old 08-31-2007, 06:29 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Miss Amy...

If you have what I think you described, 2 slabs of spare ribs frozen solid together in cryovac then take them out of the packaging and lay them on your counter for 30 minutes or an hour to start the thawing process. This will not hurt anything. When they show the first signs of thawing, then go to the refrigerator. Take them out of the refrigerator 30 minutes to one hour before cooking. If you can pry them apart before going to the fridge, that would be good. If you have two seperate slabs then use the same method.

Have Fun & Enjoy!
If they are cryovaced then why go through all that effort and time? Stick them in cold water for 30 minutes and they will be thawed.
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Old 08-31-2007, 07:01 PM   #9
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Thank you, thank you guys for all the great advice. Well, they are defrosted & ready to go. They came wrapped in paper, but noticed a small piece of plastic wrap. The groceries come from a large chain, and the trucks (as I understand it) are refrigerated. It has been about 100 plus outside, but I've had the central a/c going (on auto), & the food was cold when it was delivered. Hope they turn out okay. Should be done at 3 AM.
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Old 09-01-2007, 04:19 PM   #10
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Please don't defrost anything on the counter. Take some condiments out of the fridge if you have to...but don't defrost on the counter. The alternative method is to wrap the ribs in plastic and then run cool water over them till they defrost.

Previously frozen means they were frozen at the store, or when they were received from the slaughterhouse. It's hazardous to defrost frozen meat and then refreeze it. If it was never defrosted, it's not unsafe now. But, again, do not defrost it on the counter.
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