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Old 12-17-2011, 11:55 AM   #11
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I couldn't edit my post, but by thermometer, I mean one that registers internal temperature. I got a Taylor at BB&B for $20, and set it to 118. When reaches that temperature, the alarm will go off, and the roast will continue to cook, even though you have removed it from the heat.

I have tried some of the other methods mentioned here, (except for PD; I would never cook one of her recipes,) but Kenji's is the best one I've ever done.
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Old 12-17-2011, 12:02 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by SherryDAmore View Post
I couldn't edit my post, but by thermometer, I mean one that registers internal temperature. I got a Taylor at BB&B for $20, and set it to 118. When reaches that temperature, the alarm will go off, and the roast will continue to cook, even though you have removed it from the heat.

I have tried some of the other methods mentioned here, (except for PD; I would never cook one of her recipes,) but Kenji's is the best one I've ever done.
I use an Oregon Scientific aw129, which has an alarm that goes off 10 degrees below setpoint. By the time I get to the grill and bring something inside to the table, it's done perfectly every time!
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Old 12-17-2011, 01:12 PM   #13
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In my humble opinion, this is positively the best and most fool proof way of cooing the perfect Prime Rib every single time. Just a little math is required.

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Old 12-17-2011, 02:39 PM   #14
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I'm not sure what kind of tips you need if you are already following a recipe. I would hate to tell you one thing and have it conflict with something in the recipe you are using.
That is exactly why I suggested what to buy, not how to cook it.
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:06 PM   #15
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Everyone has their own way to cook a prime rib to perfection. Like someone else has already said, the one thing that you absolutely have to have is a meat thermometer, and you have to put it in the meat before you cook it, not while it is cooking.

Here is my recipe for a 10 lb prime rib:
Mix 8 c of rock salt with 6 cups of white flour, and about 2 tbsp rosemary. Add up to 2 cups of water until you have a thick paste.

Season the meat with some olive oil, and lots of black pepper, garlic powder, and Italian Seasoning.

In the bottom of a foil lined roasting pan, place about 1 inch of rock salt. Place the meat on the rock salt with the fat side up. Completely cover the meat with the salt paste, making sure to save some paste. Insert the thermometer. Place in a pre-heated 450 degree oven for 10 minutes to allow the salt paste to harden. Remove from oven and reduce heat to 250 degrees. Patch any holes in the shell with the remaining paste. Return the meat to the oven and cook for about 3-4 hours, or until the thermometer reaches 130 degrees. Remove from the oven and let rest for 30 minutes (do not remove the salt paste shell) to allow the meat to reach 140 degrees. Once the meat is at 140, remove the shell and serve. There will be no au jus, so plan ahead. The meat cooks faster than you think in the salt paste shell, so watch the thermometer closely after the first 2 hours. Cooking the meat at 250 degrees for a longer time makes the meat fork tender, while still keeping the meat at medium rare.

My father-in-law has been cooking prime rib forever and he finally admitted last year, that my prime rib is the best he has ever had. Quite a compliment from a 5th generation cattle rancher.

Again, though, how you cook and season your prime rib is entirely a personal choice. Just make sure you have a meat thermometer!!!!!
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:40 PM   #16
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We was thinking alike on this one Sirloin.

And I respectfully disagree with the statement that you need a thermometer. Not if you use the method Kayelle posted. Just be aware that it requires much more than a couple hours on the counter to get your roast up to room temp. 6-7 hours for a 2 rib roast.
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:42 PM   #17
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We was thinking alike on this one Sirloin.

And I respectfully disagree with the statement that you need a thermometer. Not if you use the method Kayelle posted. Just be aware that it requires much more than a couple hours on the counter to get your roast up to room temp. 6-7 hours for a 2 rib roast.

I agree. The method I posted also does not require a thermometer.
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:47 PM   #18
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I agree. The method I posted also does not require a thermometer.
TNT methods, where the guesswork is taken out, rock
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Old 12-17-2011, 06:16 PM   #19
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Yes, no thermometer needed for the the method I posted and use. I especially like that the outside is beautifully brown and crusty, and the inside is perfect every single time. I used the rock salt method once, and the flavor was great but I was unhappy with presentation of the meat. I really missed that brown crusty appearance.
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Old 12-17-2011, 06:59 PM   #20
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I always ask my butcher for a long piece of beef suet. I place it on top of the roast at the beginning. Remove it halfway through the roasting process. It gives me enough fat for a delicious Yorkshire Pudding. I bake the pudding while the roast is standing at rest. I also ask my butcher to not trim off too much of the fat.
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