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Old 12-15-2011, 03:18 PM   #51
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Except for baked, I find that if I add cold milk or liquid to hot potatoes, it doesn't matter if I use a masher or the whip on my mixer, they will come out gummy. I always heat up my milk and melt the butter before adding to the hot cooked potatoes. It is the adding of cold liquid to the hot potatoes that makes the potatoes gummy. You should at least have the liquid at room temperature. then add it very slowly to the hot potatoes. And I prefer an old fashion masher like my mother had. It leaves some great tasting lumps.

I love lumpy potatoes. There is a very upscale restaurant in downtown Boston that will serve lumpy taters upon request with a "Thank you" from the chef. When asked about it in an interview, he said it told him that the patron understood good basic food and appreciated it.
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Old 12-15-2011, 03:25 PM   #52
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Lately I have been only adding butter, sour cream and cream cheese to my mashed potatoes. No liquid but when I do add liquid it is usually 1/2 & 1/2 and it is cold. My family isn't to particular about mashed so any way they come out they eat them. LOL I use an S or waffle type masher mostly. I use a ricer, food mill or hand held mixer at times. I am going to have to make mashed soon. LOL All this mashed tater talk now has me craving them.
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Old 12-19-2011, 08:35 AM   #53
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Wen I smash my spuds, I prefer to use Yukon gold potatoes, for their fine grain and flavor. I use butter, a bit of salt, and canned (condensed) milk for a rich dairy flavor. That's what my family prefers. My youngest uses brown butter and condensed milk, with a bit of garlic. I like my smashed spuds stiff, but creamy smooth, placed on the plate with an ice-cream scoop, with a depression made in the middle to cary butter, sauce, or gravy.

Sadly, potatoes are one of those things I can only eat on rare occasions due to their starch content.

I like the blue and purple potatoes for their nutritional value, but they are hard to come by around here.

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Old 12-19-2011, 10:36 AM   #54
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If you want to rice potatoes without a ricer, get a masher that looks like this:



Or, you can get a ricer at Bed Bugs & Beyond or Target for 20 Bucks American
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Old 12-19-2011, 12:06 PM   #55
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That's exactly what my mom used - where did you find it? I'd love to get my hands on one, but it's getting a little close to Christmas.
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Old 12-19-2011, 12:32 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Dicksie View Post
That's exactly what my mom used - where did you find it? I'd love to get my hands on one, but it's getting a little close to Christmas.
That particular one costs $45.00, but you can find them for 10 or 12 bucks American at Bed Bugs & Beyond and at Target. Probably at Wally World and Martha Mart too, but I haven't looked there.
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Old 12-19-2011, 04:51 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
If you want to rice potatoes without a ricer, get a masher that looks like this:



Or, you can get a ricer at Bed Bugs & Beyond or Target for 20 Bucks American
I use one of these waffle mashers for taters without the skins and they come out creamy and almost lumpless. My mom only use this kind. I find it's easier to use an S-type for jacket taters.
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Old 03-01-2012, 12:08 PM   #58
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What other uses are there for a ricer?
Someone else might have already said this, but I've heard that you can use a ricer for squeezing the liquid out of grated raw potatoes, which makes for a better fried hash brown. I haven't actually tried it yet, although it's the main reason I recently bought my ricer because my hash browns always come out rather pathetically.
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:20 PM   #59
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I've been intending the same thing, buying a potato ricer for extracting the moisture from grated potatoes in making fried hash brown potatoes. I've found that the dryer the potatoes are the nicer browning you get.

I like my mashed potatoes lumpy. In fact I like to leave the skins in them too, and throw in some roasted garlic heads, so I'm certainly not one for smooth mashed potatoes.
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Old 03-01-2012, 10:27 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GiddyUpGo View Post
Someone else might have already said this, but I've heard that you can use a ricer for squeezing the liquid out of grated raw potatoes, which makes for a better fried hash brown. I haven't actually tried it yet, although it's the main reason I recently bought my ricer because my hash browns always come out rather pathetically.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I've been intending the same thing, buying a potato ricer for extracting the moisture from grated potatoes in making fried hash brown potatoes. I've found that the dryer the potatoes are the nicer browning you get.

I like my mashed potatoes lumpy. In fact I like to leave the skins in them too, and throw in some roasted garlic heads, so I'm certainly not one for smooth mashed potatoes.
That excess moisture in the potatoes eventually ends up helping stem the grated potatoes, and is kind of needed. Done over constant medium heat, and not monkeying with them, the will steam through, the excess liquid cooks off, and you will get a crusty golden bottom before flipping, and browning off the top. The key is not to mess with em, just let them be, and they will "cake" up, and become the hash browns you get off a flat top/griddle.
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