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Old 10-11-2008, 05:28 PM   #1
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Question Roux

If a rec. calls for a roux, how do I know how much to make? I know its equal parts flour and oil, I don't know how much to start with. THanx

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Old 10-11-2008, 05:45 PM   #2
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1-2 tablespoons of flour and oil will thicken a cup of liquid. One tablespoon will thicken a little, two will thicken a lot.

If the recipe calls for a darker roux, you will need more roux. The darker the roux, the less thickening power it has.
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Old 10-11-2008, 06:11 PM   #3
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Oil? Am I doing it wrong by using butter? Or am I just thinking of gravy?
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Old 10-11-2008, 06:12 PM   #4
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Basically equal parts of flour and a fat. The fat can be butter or oil.
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Old 10-11-2008, 06:15 PM   #5
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OK cool. Thanks!
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Old 10-11-2008, 07:49 PM   #6
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I always use butter, too. I didn't know you could make a roux with oil. Seems like it would be lacking in flavor....
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Old 10-11-2008, 07:58 PM   #7
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Sorry about the confusion! I know that to make a roux, you use butter. Thanks for the equasion! That will help a lot.
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Old 10-11-2008, 08:26 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
... I didn't know you could make a roux with oil. Seems like it would be lacking in flavor....
IMHO, it depends what you are doing. If I am making gravy, I skim the fat off my drippings and add butter to get to 2 Tbl., add the flour, etc... If I am making soup that needs to be thickened, I tend to saute my onion in EVOO then sprinkle with the flour, brown slightly, add the liquid, etc... I've never noticed a lesser flavor when I do this. Just another perspective ...
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Old 10-11-2008, 08:41 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by JMediger View Post
IMHO, it depends what you are doing. If I am making gravy, I skim the fat off my drippings and add butter to get to 2 Tbl., add the flour, etc... If I am making soup that needs to be thickened, I tend to saute my onion in EVOO then sprinkle with the flour, brown slightly, add the liquid, etc... I've never noticed a lesser flavor when I do this. Just another perspective ...
I just made some gravy from the drippings of browning some burger in EVOO. I added butter to the juice and fond, then flour, then some beef stock. I know you can incorporate oil into the mix in various proportions, both cooking with or added as an extra, I just never heard of heating straight plain oil in a pan and then adding flour to get a roux. Heating butter and flour I see all the time without any additional items.

Your examples do not show making a straight oil and flour roux for a recipe. You have included other ingredients. I would like to know if it's done for anything though.
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Old 10-11-2008, 09:10 PM   #10
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Ok,I asked this question at the New Orleans Cooking School...What's the difference between gravy and roux? The teach, basically said that roux is made with butter,and gravy is made with oil, or some pan drippings. Roux is basically a thickener for soupy things, and gravy is for bisquits and mashed taters. Sorry,that gravy part is a personal opinion.
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