"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-18-2006, 11:26 PM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
But it takes time and TASTING.
I think this is the key

thanks for all the pointers everyone. I mainly wasn't sure where to start...1/2 tsp? 1 tbsp? My soup that I made last night I put half a teaspoon in and didn't really know if it needed more so I just stopped.

Ironchef i really liked how you explained that. I always thougth of cooking as more of a process and all you have to do is follow the directions (recipe) and voila you have food. You made me realize there's quite a bit more to cooking than just that. I realized I am at the beginning of a very long journey

brad
__________________

__________________
Phantom of the Kitchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 04:19 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom of the Kitchen
I think this is the key

thanks for all the pointers everyone. I mainly wasn't sure where to start...1/2 tsp? 1 tbsp? My soup that I made last night I put half a teaspoon in and didn't really know if it needed more so I just stopped.

Ironchef i really liked how you explained that. I always thougth of cooking as more of a process and all you have to do is follow the directions (recipe) and voila you have food. You made me realize there's quite a bit more to cooking than just that. I realized I am at the beginning of a very long journey

brad
The journey is half the fun, especially when you see yourself making progress.
__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 12:08 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,049
There are many preparations where salt is a necessity to balance the flavors of the other ingredients. When we made vinaigrette in cooking school (orange vinaigrette in this case), you mixed the other ingredients then added salt just a little at a time to balance the oil and vinegar. There was no doubt at all when you hit the right seasoning.... the sharp taste of the vinegar was suddenly gone and you had a dressing that was delicious. Without the salt, it was either too oily or too vinegary (is that even a word????), depending on how much you added of the other ingredients.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 02:44 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
Am not a big user of salt, unlike my dad. He would salt salt.

I think there are two reasons why a recipe will not state the amount of salt: first, everyone's tastes vary regarding the stuff; and second, the ingredients we use do not have a guaranteed amount of salt. One can of tomatoes will not necessarily have the same salt content as another.

If I make a pot of red, the chili will be more or less salty than the previous batch just due to differences in the ingredients.

So we just try the stuff.

If the flavor seems a bit flat, will add some salt, or maybe hot sauce (that is usually very salty), or Worcestershire sauce.

Or maybe another herb altogether.

To me the art of cooking is to taste, taste, and then taste again.

As far as black pepper goes, I have overstepped the limits that a normal human would tolerate, so I don't do that anymore.

But I do usually just add a bunch.

I know this does not help a whole lot, but that is the way we cook.
__________________
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2006, 11:44 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Salt is a very important part of cooking. Yes too much salt is a bad thing, but not enough salt is equally as bad (tastewise that is). If you do not add salt to your food and your guest then add a little at the table then they are probably not ruining the flavor of the food, but actually enhancing it.


Yes!

That's one of the first things they taught in cooking school. The instructor set out maybe 8 pints of chicken broth with differing amounts of salt added. From zero to way too much. You progresivly taste the broth and get a real sense of how much salt improves the taste of food. To a point, where it detracts by being too salty.
__________________
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2006, 12:56 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I'll quickly jump into the frey here. Another part about successful seasoning is timing. Let me explain. If you lightly salt a burger whle the meat is still uncooked, the salt will dissove in the liquids that concentrate on the meat surface. The dissolved salt will distribute itself equally accross the meat surface, giving you uniform flavor in each bite. However, if you salt after the burgers are cooked, on bite may have too little salt, while the next may have too much. French fries are a perfect example of this. If you spread the fries and salt as soon as they are removed from the hot oil, the salt will be fairly evenly distributed. If you just place the fires onto a platter, and salt at the table, there will be no steam to help dissolve some of the salt, and the fries at the top, and at the bottom of the pile will have an excess while those in the middle will have too little.

And unlike spices and herbs, salt distributes its flavor immediately. It is a mineral and doesn't change in nature after it's added to the food. But most other seasonings take time to release essential oils and other flavor molecules into the food. Then, it takes time for those flavors to distribute themselves. So tasting a tomato sauce immediately after adding fresh oregano will not give you a true indication of what the sauce will taste like in 15 minutes. The same is true of pepper. So remember, when seasoning, know how the seasonings react, and how fast they react. Many a dish has been ruined by cooks tasting to quickly after adding an ingredient, and thinking they had to add more because the desired seasoning wasn't potent enough. Fifteen minutes or more later, the seasoning overpowered everything else.

Seasoning truly comes from trial and error. And what is perfect for you may be unacceptable to someone else. That's just the way it is. One more thing, and I say this to new cooks often. You can always add more flavor if it's needed. But once it's added to the food, you can't take it out.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2006, 03:05 PM   #17
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I agree with everyone, except those who don't salt at all or hate it when someone salts at the table. We're all different, and if you entertain a lot (I do), you have to realize that you aren't going to please all the people all the time. I do ask "new" guests if they have any serious food allergies to make sure I don't feed someone peanut oil or shellfish if it is going to kill them. But the salt thing is much like the "hot pepper" thing. What I call mild will probably burn the skin off of the next person's tongue, what I think is way too hot (I have a weird, inverted palate, so can burn the roof of my mouth very easily), is the next persons' minimum heat. I do NOT purposefully feed guests food I know they won't like. But if I'm "doing" a good sized group, I don't try to please everyone. As I said, I salt to a little less than I think it needs, then put out salt cellars and let everyone else adjust (I usually add, few of my guests do).
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2006, 04:48 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
patch's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 38
I really like the flaked salt as you can sprinkle it over a finished dish without getting too much. I have friends who don't like much salt at all, for health reasons, so I always go light when they're at my table. But have you noticed how some people start salting food they are served, even before they've tasted it?
For those who have to severely limit their salt, microwaving the vegetables can make a big difference.
But some things must have salt - porridge for one. And avocado.

Pat
www.cookingdownunder.com
__________________
patch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2006, 01:24 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Shaheen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Bombay, India
Posts: 338
I went through some Culinary School recipes that I have and the amount of salt used is 10 grams for a 4 portion meal.
__________________
The Purple Foodie
Shaheen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2006, 04:17 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Due to my husband's health (& the health of many others these days, unfortunately), I rarely if ever, add salt to recipes while cooking anymore. If we feel something needs a dash of salt, we add it at serving time.
__________________

__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.