"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-13-2008, 10:08 AM   #11
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
For the very reason that we are all saying that searing does not seal in juices. Searing actually expels juice which is why you see that pool on top of the burger. If searing sealed in juices then you would not see any liquid because it would be sealed inside the meat.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 10:36 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
For the very reason that we are all saying that searing does not seal in juices. Searing actually expels juice which is why you see that pool on top of the burger. If searing sealed in juices then you would not see any liquid because it would be sealed inside the meat.
No. A pocket inside the patty. Like a big blister of sorts.
__________________

__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 10:45 AM   #13
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Well searing will not expel every single drop of juice of course so you can still end up with a very juicy product if cooked right, which it sounds like you do.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 11:31 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
I'm just curious as to why it makes that pocket. I poked one once and wound up with a hockey puck. I usually use 85% ground beef.

As far as steaks and such goes, who knows? It looks good and tastes good. I think resting is the key to juicy meat.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 12:20 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
Quote:
Originally Posted by -Cp View Post
How come so many people say you need to "Sear the meat to lock in the juices" when that is simply not true??

I've heard even "pros" make this claim...
Some professional chefs tell you not to rinse mushrooms, too.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 12:26 PM   #16
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
I'm just curious as to why it makes that pocket. I poked one once and wound up with a hockey puck. I usually use 85% ground beef.

As far as steaks and such goes, who knows? It looks good and tastes good. I think resting is the key to juicy meat.

When you apply heat to meat/fish/poultry, it shrinks. It shrinks as a whole and each of the cells contract as well. This squeezes internal juices out of the cells and it collects in the meat. When you poke or press the meat, the juices escape leaving you with a dry burger or whatever.

This is why you are taught to use tongs rather than forks, to never press a burger on the grill and to rest your meat after cooking. The resting meat cools and the "clenched" proteins relax and reabsorb their juices.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 12:34 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
I'm not agreeing or disagreeing, but why is it that when I make fresh hamburgers and sear them, I get a big ol pocket of meat juice on top?
Here's how I learned it in college:
The intense heat of the sear causes the proteins to coagulate rapidly, in which they swell, and as a result, constrict the vessels and pathways by which the juices would leak out. Since those vessels and pathways are closed, and the protein is coagulating, the juices are forced to the center of the item. On a burger, since it's all ground up, especially if it's cooked just a tad to long on the first side, the juices will actually be forced THROUGH to item and will pool on the upper surface. While this is readily apparent in burgers, I've seen it in steaks as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
As far as steaks and such goes, who knows? It looks good and tastes good. I think resting is the key to juicy meat.
If the steak/chicken/fish/etc. is cooked properly, it will be searing on all sides, without the juices being forced out the top (resulting in dry sandpaper meat). These juices will still be in the center of the item, and when allowed to rest after cooking, will naturally distribute back through the item, resulting in a juicy cut of grilled meat.

A lot of doing this is just timing, and experience cooking that item, and knowing your equipment. Last week, I grilled some chicken breast, boness/skinless, marianted, for the Food & Beverage manager. He couldn't believe how good it was! I think the day-time cooks are overcooking the food, as I have to turn the grill down every day when I come in.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 12:42 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
I'm not sure you get the picture about the burger. When I make burgers from scratch using 85% ground beef and grill them or cook them in a pan, a large pocket of juice develops INSIDE the burger NOT on top or in a pool or whatever. The first time I ever saw it, I poked the bubble-like pocket and a bunch of juices ran out. I always use tongs, I was just saying what happened that time. When the burgers are done, they are extremely juicy to the point it looks like soup on your plate sometimes.

I really only flip them once and I'm very gentle cooking them. Could that be why they form?

Oh, and I start by searing them, then turning the heat down to finish cooking.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 12:47 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
I'm not agreeing or disagreeing, but why is it that when I make fresh hamburgers and sear them, I get a big ol pocket of meat juice on top?
I think this might be why there is some confusion.... your first post you said on top.
But then, I could have sworn I saw an email from this post that said 90% lean Now it says 85
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2008, 01:11 PM   #20
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I think this might be why there is some confusion.... your first post you said on top.
But then, I could have sworn I saw an email from this post that said 90% lean Now it says 85
Well I guess I said the "on top" part because it's on top when I'm cooking it. I changed the 90-85 in like 3 seconds after I posted it. (brain fart)

I'll take a photo next time I make some.
__________________

__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.