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Old 10-01-2013, 02:34 PM   #11
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For searing a steak, I often cut off a piece of the fat and grease the hot pan with it.
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Old 10-01-2013, 03:35 PM   #12
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I don't use stainless steel to brown/sear anything. Cast iron works the best for me.
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Old 10-01-2013, 05:14 PM   #13
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I sear various types of meat, but I think I've had a huge misunderstanding on how high the heat should be. I decided to experiment. I cleaned the pan and put it on the skillet with a couple of tbsp of Safflower oil in it. I turned the heat up one notch at a time and waited a few minutes watching for shimmer / smoke. I could only get halfway before the pan started to smoke. I guess this is the max heat I should use? To think, I was turning the heat all the way up, lol. Also, I have another cheap pan I can crack to the max heat, and it apparently doesn't get as hot as the other pan on half heat. Quite a difference.
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Old 10-01-2013, 05:42 PM   #14
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Use the highest heat setting to heat the pan. Why wait for a lower heat to do the job. However, when the oil starts to smoke, add the meat and adjust the heat.
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Old 10-01-2013, 06:12 PM   #15
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Any oil heated past its smoke point is toxic.

Don't do that.
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Old 10-01-2013, 07:14 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattdaddym View Post
I sear various types of meat, but I think I've had a huge misunderstanding on how high the heat should be. I decided to experiment. I cleaned the pan and put it on the skillet with a couple of tbsp of Safflower oil in it. I turned the heat up one notch at a time and waited a few minutes watching for shimmer / smoke. I could only get halfway before the pan started to smoke. I guess this is the max heat I should use? To think, I was turning the heat all the way up, lol. Also, I have another cheap pan I can crack to the max heat, and it apparently doesn't get as hot as the other pan on half heat. Quite a difference.
Like I said in the second post, when it starts to shimmer add the meat. That will immediately lower the oil temp and any smoke is just cooking.
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:29 AM   #17
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Am I the ONLY person who sears a hunk of meat in a dry pan? Granted I do use oil if I'm searing chunks of floured-and-seasoned meat for a stew type dish, but when it's a roast I'll put it in a dry pan. A lovely crust ensues, and that's exactly what I'm looking for.

My Mom always fully seasoned her roast meats before she seared them. Of course I did it the same way when I first got married. I nearly choked to death from the dusty effect that seems to rise up from the pan. I put only a bit of salt on the meat before searing to give it that nice crust, but wait until I'm ready to put the pan in the oven or the lid on the dutch oven before adding the rest of my seasonings.
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Old 10-02-2013, 07:13 AM   #18
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Am I the ONLY person who sears a hunk of meat in a dry pan? Granted I do use oil if I'm searing chunks of floured-and-seasoned meat for a stew type dish, but when it's a roast I'll put it in a dry pan. A lovely crust ensues, and that's exactly what I'm looking for.
Apparently so When I don't use oil for searing, the food seems to stick and burn more. I'm usually searing pork chops, chicken pieces, etc., and always use oil.
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Old 10-02-2013, 08:32 AM   #19
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I sear steak in a cast iron skillet with just a T of salt thrown into the bottom of the pan. Never sticks or burns.
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Old 10-02-2013, 09:27 AM   #20
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So I found that the safflower oil just barely starts to smoke when I have the temp at 7 out of 11. I tried cooking some chicken at both 6 and 7. I did get a nice crust after about 3 1/2 minutes. Not too much smoke. I'm cooking some thin steak tonight, so will see how this works out. Thanks all.
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