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Old 06-27-2007, 10:16 AM   #1
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Simple Syrup Technique w/ flavor compound

Good Morning All,

Listen, I have never made a simple syrup before, that I know of. This coming from a person who can make the best gourmet meal on a microbrew budget, but STILL can't make fries (whereas my partner CAN, and she still can't go to the right cabinet for a glass much less to the cab w/ the pots)
Anyhow, I want to duplicate 2 of the coffee syrups, namely cinnamon & vanilla.
So, please guide me in this venture.
A) How many parts sugar to water?
B) How long to cook/boil/simmer?
C) When would you add flavors?
D) How much to add? Like for cinnamon sticks, or a vanilla bean?
E) How long do you keep the flavor in the syrup?
F) How long does the syrup last?
G) Refrigerated or room temp (My homemade caramel sauce does just fine on the counter)

Thanks guys.
B.

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Old 06-27-2007, 10:36 AM   #2
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To make a basic simple syrup you start out with equal parts water and white sugar (with that being said your cinnamon syrup would be GREAT made with brown sugar instead!!!!!)

1 cup sugar
1 cup water

At the time you add your water and sugar to the pan add whatever flavoring you want. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for about 20 - 25 minutes.

That's the simple syrup - to make flavorings you add them at the beginning of this process. The flavorings can be:

(these are for 1 whole recipe which is 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water added to the beginning of the process and then removed through cheesecloth after the liquid has cooled.)

1 tsp. vanilla extract or a left-over pod that you used the beans out of

1 tsp. ground cinnamon or a couple sticks

You can even experiment with a combination of honey, fresh ginger, pumpkin spice, etc.

I make a simple syrup for mojitos by using the basic recipe above but adding mint and squeezing lime into it.
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Old 06-27-2007, 10:49 AM   #3
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Ooh, ooh, I happen to have some chocolate mint in my little herb garden I was searching for something to do with. Thanks for the tip. AND for the brown sugar tip. How cool.

A couple more questions for an apparent master of simple syrup,

Keeps how long? Refrigerated or not?
Would I muddle the mint then add to syrup?
Why do I have to remove the vanilla seeds? (I'm sure I'll catch **** for this question)

Thanks, man, I appreciate it.

B.
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Old 06-27-2007, 11:14 AM   #4
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Funny, I went to get a cup of coffee, take the dog for a walk, and I'm thinking - "Oh, I never finished answering all of the questions"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

So,

Whatever syrup you make let it cool and strain through a wire mesh strainer or use the addition of cheesecloth too.

Keep in a mason jar or glass container of some sort in the refrigerator.

A basic simple syrup will last quite awhile - I'm not so sure about the others with a lot of "stuff" in them - probably a couple weeks? I'll have to do a bit of research or maybe someone will stop by this thread that knows for sure.

You don't have to muddle the mint but you can give it a rub in your palms before you add to the water.

Reference the vanilla pod - I'm assuming, if you have a pod, you have scraped the seeds out already to make something else. The pod has plenty of flavor and can even be stored in sugar and after a week or so (don't remove the pod, just leave it in there and keep adding more sugar as needed) you will have some lovely vanilla sugar. I would not waste the seeds from the inside by boiling in some simple syrup when the left-over pod can be used.

If you are into baking at all you can make a white cake, poke holes with the end of a wooden spoon, and pour some kind of flavored simple syrup all over the cake and then let it cool.
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Old 06-27-2007, 01:04 PM   #5
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But wouldn't the cake become soggy w/ the addition of a liquid? Yes, I am a fantastic baker, and cook, and all around foodie
But, alas, I have only just recently moved into a place where there is an actual kitchen a foodie can appreciate. So, my cooking time and level of difficulty will soon expand.

Anyhow, listen kitchenelf, you are a dear for taking the time to help a girl out here. I wrote down the recipe as you instructed, and will make some this weekend.

Thanks.

B.

PS: Would you be the person to ask about techniques for pasta making? Or different types of flours, and reasons why my pancakes were discettes when made w/ oat flour only?
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Old 06-27-2007, 01:20 PM   #6
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About the cake - poke holes in while still warm then let cake cool - no, it's not soggy, just nice and moist.

About pasta - just find the Pasta forum and ask there. I have only made pasta a couple times - my son didn't like it - but he was pretty young then - may try it again!

There are people more qualified than me to ask about pancake batter - we have some pancake pros here!!!!!! You can ask in the Bread, Cornbread, Sandwich Forum since that includes things like waffles.

We also have a Pasta, Rice, Bean, and Grain Forum for your pasta question.

If in doubt, feel free to post any question in the General Cooking Questions Forum.
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Old 06-28-2007, 09:15 AM   #7
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Well, kitchenelf, I made a vanilla syrup last nite and used it in my latte this AM. The syrup is awesome!!! I used an entire vanilla bean, scraped out the seeds and used those too, and now my question is, since I used said bean, can I use it again? Meaning, how many times would I be able to get pure vanilla flavor from this bean? I think I should be able to use it at least once more, right? I guess I will have to experiment and see. For now, it is in the fridge wrapped in the coffee filter.
THANK YOU!!!

B.
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