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Old 02-22-2011, 09:54 AM   #11
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I've got nothing better to do than comment on an old thread right now...
The thing I found weird when reading this is, "tin" appears to be a UK term from the recipes I've seen, but yet the other measurements are given in pounds. I've only seen tin used in conjunction with metric measurement recipes.
But I've only seen the movie
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Old 02-22-2011, 10:27 AM   #12
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It has always been a pet peeve of mine where recipes list a "small can" (or similar) of an ingredient. It's too imprecise as this thread demonstrates.

Listing such imprecise quantities should be a federal offense punishable by death.
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Old 02-22-2011, 12:24 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neilski View Post
Bumping an ancient thread here I know, but for the benefit of people (like me) who find this on google etc...

Way way back**, there used to be two sizes of condensed milk tins in the UK - 7 oz and 14 oz. These days they only sell the "big" cans/tins - which are now labelled as 397 g (i.e. 14 oz). A small can of condensed milk would definitely have meant 7 oz.
This recipe came from those old days - I remember cos I used to make it.
What I'm personally confused about is whether it was evaporated or condensed milk in the book (might have to visit the library!). I remember it as condensed, but everything I can find on the net says evaporated

If it really does say evaporated milk in the recipe then I'm a little unsure - it may or may not have been in the same size tins as the condensed stuff. Today a quick search on a supermarket website suggests they sell it in 170 g and 410 g sizes. Weird, eh?

Will be making it today btw, and will probably go with evaporated

** I mean the 70s and 80s...
Well, what is the recipe. Maybe we can help. Is it a sweet recipe? Does it call for the milk and sugar?

Oh....btw....welcome to DC!
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Old 02-22-2011, 01:21 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Mama View Post
Well, what is the recipe. Maybe we can help. Is it a sweet recipe? Does it call for the milk and sugar?

Oh....btw....welcome to DC!
Thanks Have to admit I'm not much of a cook though!
And yes, it's sweet - it's the same recipe as the OP: the Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Fooj. Great stuff! Must be close to twenty years since I made it mind you...
In fact, I've been googling just now to figure out what to do about the corn syrup the recipe asks for - not on the shelf here in the UK. Looks like Golden Syrup might work instead tho.

I may have to make it several times to get it just right

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
The thing I found weird when reading this is, "tin" appears to be a UK term from the recipes I've seen, but yet the other measurements are given in pounds. I've only seen tin used in conjunction with metric measurement recipes.
The UK used to use exclusively Imperial units (for, eh, obvious reasons ) and that was certainly the case when the book was published. But it's all (more or less) metric now, like the rest of the EU.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
It has always been a pet peeve of mine where recipes list a "small can" (or similar) of an ingredient. It's too imprecise as this thread demonstrates.
Yup, it's totally bananas. But then again, what's a cup? No two cups in my house are the same volume
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Old 02-22-2011, 01:56 PM   #15
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Well, after "Googling" the recipe, with that much sugar plus corn syrup, I would venture to say that it would HAVE to be evaporated milk.

Here's a link to The Joy of Baking website for substitutions: Ingredient Substitution - Joyofbaking.com
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Old 02-22-2011, 03:07 PM   #16
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Cool, thanks. Maybe I always used to make it with condensed milk (which might explain a few things!)...
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Old 02-22-2011, 04:13 PM   #17
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Speaking of imprecise recipes, I was going through my grandmother's selections and the rum-ball recipe called for a "ten cent package of vanilla wafers"! good grief!
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Old 02-22-2011, 07:08 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Linda123 View Post
Speaking of imprecise recipes, I was going through my grandmother's selections and the rum-ball recipe called for a "ten cent package of vanilla wafers"! good grief!
Now if you had a ten cent package you would have a crumb!
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Old 02-22-2011, 09:43 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neilski View Post
Thanks Have to admit I'm not much of a cook though!
And yes, it's sweet - it's the same recipe as the OP: the Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Fooj. Great stuff! Must be close to twenty years since I made it mind you...
In fact, I've been googling just now to figure out what to do about the corn syrup the recipe asks for - not on the shelf here in the UK. Looks like Golden Syrup might work instead tho.

I may have to make it several times to get it just right

PS:
The UK used to use exclusively Imperial units (for, eh, obvious reasons ) and that was certainly the case when the book was published. But it's all (more or less) metric now, like the rest of the EU.

Yup, it's totally bananas. But then again, what's a cup? No two cups in my house are the same volume
On the right (west) side of the pond, a cup is 8 U.S. ounces, ~450 ml. It's a standard. Four cups to a quart, but that's U.S. quarts, not Imperial quarts.
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Old 02-22-2011, 09:45 PM   #20
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Older Canadian recipes can be fun too. Is that Imperial ounces or U.S. ounces? Before we went metric, we used the Imperial system, but cooking were influenced by U.S. magazines, etc.
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