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Old 09-21-2005, 12:33 PM   #1
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Sour Milk

Anyone know how to make sour milk
Thanks

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Old 09-21-2005, 12:37 PM   #2
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1 cup of milk and about 2 TBS of lime juice or white vinegar. That's how I've always done it. You will see it start to separate when you have enough acid in it. Give it a few minutes to sit though to really work!
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Old 09-21-2005, 12:38 PM   #3
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Add a tablespoon of vinegar to each cup of milk and let it stand for a little bit....can replace buttermilk in recipes with that....at least that's my way! I bet there's others who do it differently here!
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Old 09-21-2005, 12:40 PM   #4
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Kitchenelf beat me to it! I bet 2 tablespoons would work even better!
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Old 09-21-2005, 12:50 PM   #5
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KAYLINDA - I get impatient and just use more acid! lol
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Old 09-22-2005, 05:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
1 cup of milk and about 2 TBS of lime juice or white vinegar. That's how I've always done it. You will see it start to separate when you have enough acid in it. Give it a few minutes to sit though to really work!
I was going to say leave it on the counter for a few days. Shows you I still have a ways to go in the culinary world
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Old 09-22-2005, 05:31 PM   #7
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LOL gettingbetter - It would be "sour" just don't know if it would be useable! Usually about 20 minutes tops is all it takes if even that long.
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Old 09-22-2005, 05:37 PM   #8
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What would you use sour (your method, not mine) milk for?
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Old 09-22-2005, 05:44 PM   #9
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When a recipe calls for buttermilk and you don't have any this is how you make it. I use it when I cook fried chicken or fried lobster chunks (dip in sour milk, dip in flour/cornstarch/garlic/s&p, back in sour milk or buttermilk then back in flour mixture - and for salad dressings calling for buttermilk and pretty much anything else that calls for only a bit of buttermilk - I will use this method instead of buying a whole container.
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Old 09-22-2005, 06:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
When a recipe calls for buttermilk and you don't have any this is how you make it. I use it when I cook fried chicken or fried lobster chunks (dip in sour milk, dip in flour/cornstarch/garlic/s&p, back in sour milk or buttermilk then back in flour mixture - and for salad dressings calling for buttermilk and pretty much anything else that calls for only a bit of buttermilk - I will use this method instead of buying a whole container.
Well, I learned something today. Mission accomplished

Thanks for taking the time to explain.
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