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Old 12-18-2011, 07:55 PM   #11
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I've never had a prime rib with the bone left intact. That's not saying they weren't offered on the side at a family gathering, but the bone's were always sliced off before the roast was sliced. I do mine the same way Dad did. Love the bones, but I don't want to cut around them when eating prime rib.
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:10 PM   #12
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We have a restaurant at our big tourist trap Faneuil Hall. It is called Durgin's Park. They serve two different rib cuts. The small cut, (sans bone) and the big cut (with bone). The one with the bone is humongous. You get the bone right in the middle so that there is meat of both sides of the bone. All your sides are served on small plates. The meat takes up the whole plate with some hanging over the edge.
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:30 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Half a pound per person. Ten people for dinner? A 5 pound rib roast will do the trick.
Andy, that must be a typo, right? There's no possible way a 5 lb rib roast will feed ten adults, since a 5 lb roast will have only two ribs. I allow two people per rib, so for ten people you'll need at least 5 ribs.
Refer to the video I posted that shows two ribs to feed four people. Just sayin'
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Old 12-18-2011, 08:44 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Andy, that must be a typo, right? There's no possible way a 5 lb rib roast will feed ten adults, since a 5 lb roast will have only two ribs. I allow two people per rib, so for ten people you'll need at least 5 ribs.
Refer to the video I posted that shows two ribs to feed four people. Just sayin'
Restaurants figure 3-4 servings per pound of meat. That's 1/3 to 1/4 pound of meat each. To allow for the bone, I jacked that up to a half pound per person.

The way you put it it sounds like it wouldn't be enough.

Upon doing some checking, I have to agree - two portions per rib. Not sure what that is in pounds.

Thanks for calling me on that.
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Old 12-18-2011, 09:27 PM   #15
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There was once a terrific restaurant in my hometown called The Flame that had the best prime rib. I've never had any with a flavor to match. Unfortunately, The Flame burned to the ground and they did not build back. I would love to know how they made their prime rib. Kayelle's video looks like it though. I was much too young to know of the spices, etc.


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Old 12-18-2011, 10:38 PM   #16
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I'm just offering my opinion here. There is no way I would want PR without bone in. And I'd forget all that Frenching stuff, never seen it in a restaurant (on beef, seen it on lamb racks). Just get a nice bone in prime rib and cut it between the bones.

And I'd say, oh, um, about 1-1/2 to 2 pounds per person.... Okay just kidding, but I really love prime rib.

Maybe about 3/4 lb. per person, before cooking and including the bones. IMO that would cook down to about 8-10 oz. per serving (excluding the bone weight), a nice portion per serving. (I'll take two please.)

I hope I'm not the only person who loves horseradish and not the creamed stuff (horseradish mixed with sour cream). There's nothing like a pure blast of horseradish with a nicely rare or MR prime rib, au jus.
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Old 12-18-2011, 11:29 PM   #17
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I've made prime rib every Christmas for the last 13 years. My butcher says (and I agree with him) to figure 3/4 lb per person. Now there seems to be some controversy in the above posts concerning the bone. I've always removed the bone (the part that makes it a "standing" roast) before slicing individual portions, and this is also the way I've always had it served in restaurants. So my own take on it is that no one gets a bone. But to each their own.

I save the entire bone section to make beef stock. It really makes the most beautiful stock, especially if you roast the bone before simmering it.

One other thing I'll add is that I'd buy the roast 3 or 4 days before cooking it. This gives it some time to dry out and age a little. Loosely wrap the whole thing in a couple of layers of paper towels and set it on a rack over a pan in the fridge. The paper towels will help absorb the moisture and any excess will drip into the pan. Change the paper towels daily. I've seen some recipes where they will say to use cloth towels, but I think paper towels work as well and have the advantage of being disposable.

After a little age, the roast will be noticeably smaller in size and have just the slightest air of funkiness to it, but it will have a nice complex flavor - which is a good thing. Rib roast can sometimes be a little bland when it's very fresh.

Oh, and forget the Frenching part. It's completely unnecessary.

Good luck with your roast.
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Old 12-18-2011, 11:51 PM   #18
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Back when I could afford Prime Rib Roast, I used have the butcher or I would myself cut the meat off the bone. Then I would roast in on the bones. The roast was served as boneless. The bones were saved for broth.
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Old 12-19-2011, 12:03 AM   #19
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Many ears ago, my parents would do a standing rib roast and then call me to come get the leftovers (at the time I had the choice to pay rent or eat). When I got to the house, there would be 5 bones and a serving of prime rib. This meal from "leftovers" would last me a week.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:45 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
We have a restaurant at our big tourist trap Faneuil Hall. It is called Durgin's Park. They serve two different rib cuts. The small cut, (sans bone) and the big cut (with bone). The one with the bone is humongous. You get the bone right in the middle so that there is meat of both sides of the bone. All your sides are served on small plates. The meat takes up the whole plate with some hanging over the edge.
Addie, your description of that large cut made my mouth just go crazy! I'm drooling like a rabid dog! I'm sorry to hear you aren't back on your feet totally yet. My best wishes to you on having a speedy and complete recovery from your illness. This has gone on long enough!
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