"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-17-2011, 11:05 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 350
Standing rib roast - trim/cut

I want to make a standing rib roast (for the first time) for Christmas this year and as I am browsing recipes... I see a few variations on what exactly is called for. Some recipes just call for a 5 lb. "standing rib roast" while others call for a "French-cut rib-eye roast" and lastly, in one of the recipes, it says to request the butcher "french" the roast (I assume this is the same as the previously mentioned cut).

So now I am a bit confused as to what I should be ordering from my grocery store... basically my questions come down to this:

1. I assume bone-in is preferably to boneless (they offer both), correct?
2. Do I really need to request a "french" cut? Is it beneficial in any way?
3. Do I ask them to trim the roast in any way (I assume fat layer)? Some recipes call for the roast to be "trimmed."

Thanks!

__________________

__________________
crankin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2011, 11:15 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,794
I wouldn't bother with asking for French cut. It is a little nicer presentation, but other than that, it really doesn't change the quality of the finished product. French cut is basically cleaning the flesh from the end of the ribs so your clean bone ends are protruding from your piece of meat. Looks good, that's about it. That end is also fatty, so you may pay a little less for some fat you aren't going to eat, but they may charge you for the extra work anyway.
__________________

__________________
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2011, 08:04 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,074
All Frenching is, to scrape and remover the meat on the bone. Then you get to put those cute little white stockings on the bone ends for presentation. If that is what you want, you can do that yourself. But I think it is a waste of very tasty meat. "The nearer the bone, the sweeter the meat." And since the meat is weighed before the butcher Frenches the bones, you are still gong to pay for any meat he removes. He tosses that scraped meat into the pile of trimmed mixed meat for hamburg. So he is making a profit twice. And that goes for the fat also. That fat will give you the flavor will need for Yorkshire Pudding or gravy. If you are paying for a 10 # piece of meat, bring home a ten pounder. Don't leave all the good parts for the butcher to sell again.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2011, 09:14 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,229
The only think I would ask the butcher to do is to remove the chine bone. Carving is much easier if you can slice between the ribs.

This page, from Corti's, is the best explanation of what to expect and to ask for that I know of:
Standing rib roast at Corti Brothers
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2011, 10:27 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
The only think I would ask the butcher to do is to remove the chine bone. Carving is much easier if you can slice between the ribs.

This page, from Corti's, is the best explanation of what to expect and to ask for that I know of:
Standing rib roast at Corti Brothers
Ooops! I forgot about the chine bone. But I still wouldn't let the butcher keep it. Roast it right along with the roast. Makes for great bone knoshing. Or even homemade beef stock. Lots of flavor.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2011, 06:52 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 350
I just realized another question.... is there a general rule as to how many pounds to buy per person (is a 5 lb. roast enough for 4 people... considering weight of the bone, etc.)?
__________________
crankin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2011, 06:58 PM   #7
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
Half a pound per person. Ten people for dinner? A 5 pound rib roast will do the trick.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2011, 07:17 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Half a pound per person. Ten people for dinner? A 5 pound rib roast will do the trick.
Some will get a bone and some will not. Tell grandma to leave her teeth at home. No bone for her. Children don't get a knife. No bone for them. Fill everyone up on appetizers. Some will ask for a very small piece. No bone for them. Some will only want 'well done.' That means an end piece. No bone for them. Guess what. You and hubby get all the pieces with a bone. The best part.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2011, 07:26 PM   #9
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Some will get a bone and some will not. Tell grandma to leave her teeth at home. No bone for her. Children don't get a knife. No bone for them. Fill everyone up on appetizers. Some will ask for a very small piece. No bone for them. Some will only want 'well done.' That means an end piece. No bone for them. Guess what. You and hubby get all the pieces with a bone. The best part.
When carving a rib roast, I'd first remove the cooked roast from the bones then slice it as needed. No one gets a bone.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2011, 07:43 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
When carving a rib roast, I'd first remove the cooked roast from the bones then slice it as needed. No one gets a bone.
Oh my! I want a bone. With or without my teeth. "The nearer the bone, the sweeter the meat." My daughter is serving a rib roast. She has two males to feed. Her son is a strapping 6'2" and looks like a football player. He will get a bone. And her husband will definitely want a bone. The dog will get the empty bones. I am hoping that I get my appetite back in time to enjoy the meal. If not, I will be the one who takes a very small portion. Eat just enough to be polite.

This loss of appetite is really getting to me.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
roast

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.