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Old 02-13-2012, 08:35 PM   #21
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I don't flip a lot but I do like the marks.

However you might want to go to this page and go down to number 3.

The Food Lab's Top 6 Food Myths | Serious Eats
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Old 02-13-2012, 09:07 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
HF has the process right. Proteins will initially stick to the pan then release when a crust has formed.
Thanks for the advice Andy. Based upon what you say I'm more likely to try it. Unfortunately my cast iron skillet is in storage and all I have is a wok with what appears to be some anodized surface. I'm reluctant to trust it but I'm also reluctant to ignore the advice of the many expert chefs at DC. I've seen too much advice here on this site that jives with my own personal experience that I'd scoff anything or any member who has any kind of history at DC at all. Most of the cooking wisdom I've seen here is the real deal. Some professional chefs and mostly talented, enthusiastic amateur chefs. It would be silly to ignore advice from a mix like that.
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Old 02-13-2012, 09:43 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
I don't flip a lot but I do like the marks.

However you might want to go to this page and go down to number 3.

The Food Lab's Top 6 Food Myths | Serious Eats
I believe America's Test Kitchen also did similar tests, and arrived at the same result. Ever since these 2 articles came out, I've switched from the 'flip once' camp to the 'flip frequently' camp. I've been very pleased with the result.
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Old 02-13-2012, 09:59 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Silversage View Post
I believe America's Test Kitchen also did similar tests, and arrived at the same result. Ever since these 2 articles came out, I've switched from the 'flip once' camp to the 'flip frequently' camp. I've been very pleased with the result.
For oven broiling thicker steaks (wintertime of course), more than 2 flip times gets the center of my steaks med rare and not raw rare.
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Old 02-13-2012, 10:15 PM   #25
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I believe America's Test Kitchen also did similar tests, and arrived at the same result. Ever since these 2 articles came out, I've switched from the 'flip once' camp to the 'flip frequently' camp. I've been very pleased with the result.
The link in your quote discussed hamburgers. I'm not entirely convinced it applies to steaks. I totally trust ATK and if they said it's so then I'd trust it. I haven't been able to Google any ATK posts regarding flipping steaks.

Please supply ATK links/quotes if you can find any, applicable to steaks.
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Old 02-13-2012, 11:05 PM   #26
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Of course, I only flip once...I'm to lazy to wait, it has to be able to walk onto my plate.
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Old 02-14-2012, 12:07 PM   #27
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Of course, I only flip once...I'm to lazy to wait, it has to be able to walk onto my plate.
The steak is better if you have to chase it down to eat it...
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Old 02-14-2012, 12:11 PM   #28
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The steak is better if you have to chase it down to eat it...
Cut the horns off and wipe it's arse....
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Old 02-14-2012, 01:16 PM   #29
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That's a good point Andy, that the browning marks are flavor: Maillard reaction. The part of the steak that doesn't get scorched doesn't get it. An assumption here is that the increased total length of grill marks exceeds the browning to greater depth by not crosshatching. I have no idea if that is correct but I believe there can be no doubt that the browning marks are more than cosmetic in grilled steaks. That might be why I often pan sear steaks despite the fact that I enjoy grilling.
Browning adds minimal flavor. I proved this because I had heard it said so many times and just had to find out. It does add flavor, but not a lot, and not that grilled flavor that we love.

To prove it to myself, and also the idea that intense heat creates the grilled flavor. I pan-fried a steak on a grill pan (with ridges) that made beautiful grill marks. I did it over medium high heat so as to not generate smoke. I tasted the steak. It tasted like a pan-fried steak. I then hit the steak with a butane torch over the top side, to test the intense heat theory. Again, nice maillard reaction, still tasted like a pan fried steak.

Cooked on a grill over a direct bed of charcoal, but used very lean meat. Great grill marks were achieved, little smoke was produced, and it tastes a lot like a pan fried steak.

Used a well marbled steak and cooiked over charcoal, letting the fat drip down and burn, creating smoke. Ah yes, now that's the flavor I was looking for.

Grilled flavor comes from smoke particle deposits on the meat surface. The smoke has to be from burning fat, not wood smoke. That's what creates the most flavor in beef. As I said, maillard helps, especially when your talking about a pan fried steak, or broiled steak. But fat dripping onto hot carcoal, or "flavorizer bars" on a gas grill, creates the smoke that flavors the meat.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-14-2012, 02:01 PM   #30
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Your test shows that a steak cooked on a grill with fat and smoke tastes different from a pan fried steak. That's not the issue.

Pan fry a steak with a nice dark brown crust then pan fry a steak over low heat so no dark brown crust forms and compare those. That was the discussion point.
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