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Old 09-24-2005, 12:48 PM   #1
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Substituting Agar for Gelatin

Hi: Can anyone tell me if they've tried subbing Agar for Gelatin? I have a recipe I need to substitute. Thanks in advance

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Old 09-24-2005, 08:01 PM   #2
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Hi Selket51,
A big welcome to DC!!!

Yes, in most recipes you can sub agar-agar for geletin. I've done it many times in sweet recipes and find that you can often get away with using a little less agar-agar then the amount of geletin called for.

What kind of recipe is it? Perhaps I've done the same.
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Old 09-24-2005, 09:33 PM   #3
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Agar

Thanks for the information, did you do anything in particular to the agar such as soak it first or mix it with something. I was wanting to make some Gelato.

thanks
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Old 09-24-2005, 10:55 PM   #4
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Hi Selket51,

I've worked with the flakes and powder, for both I dissolve them in about a cup (250 ml) or so of liquid. About a teaspoons or so of the powder, a little more for the flakes (say 1 1/2 tbsp) ...I find this gives you a gelatine product which is similar to the consistency of regular Jell-o with your end product. (For a larger amount of liquid simply multiple your amount of agar accordingly.)

Stir the agar into you juice (liquid) and slowly bring to a boil, stirring quite often. Once it's the boil, reduce your heat a lot (say down to low) and stir off and on for about another 5-7 minutes, to make sure that all the agar has dissolved. Then add anything else you are adding to the mixture, pour it into a bowl (I like glass) and leave it to set for at least 5 hours (I've found it takes a bit longer than normal gelatine to set). I've read, but not tried (yet) that agar products can even set at room temperature.

It's good to keep in mind that some types of acid fruits/veg (as well as those that arw high in oxalic acid) can break down the gelling properties (enzymes) of agar-agar, just as they can with traditional gelatine (things like papayas, kiwis and guavas)...but cooking these fruits first (before adding them to you agar mixture can help prevent this affect).

A quick Google search turned up this gelato recipe that uses agar: http://www.davincigourmet.com/page.p...ea8726ce43&s=0


Let us know how your creation turns out
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Old 09-25-2005, 02:52 PM   #5
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Agar

Jessica:

Thank you so much for the advice and the recipe, I'm going to try it. Now that I have the recipe I can try others. I like to be experimental in the kitchen.

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Old 09-25-2005, 08:52 PM   #6
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Hi Selket51,

Don't mention it I hope you have good luck with agar!

If you create anything awesome please share the recipe with us all.
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Old 09-25-2005, 09:34 PM   #7
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I've never heard of agar. Is it a foreign thing? Where do you buy it? Does anyone else here use it?
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Old 09-26-2005, 02:14 AM   #8
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Hi Kay,

Agar-agar is a vegetarian gelatine that comes from a type of Japanese seaweed. Agar can be used in place of animal (commercially prepared) gelatines. Here are too cool links with more info, the first has a few recipes at the bottom:

http://www.asiafood.org/glossary_1.c...tno=1&endno=25

http://www.foodsubs.com/ThickenGelatins.html

I pick mine up at health food shops these days, but in the past I also found it in larger Asian food stores.

Here is a pick of agar in it's "raw" (aka as a seaweed) state.

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Old 09-27-2005, 07:56 AM   #9
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Gelatin is a cousin to protien and comes from disolviing collagen that is found in cartilage and bone tissue. Agar is a fiber, much like qsillium husks, that is derived from seaweed. Both absorb and stabilize water in a "plastic" state (plastic being something between a liquid and solid). Both have healthful benefits for the body. The fiber helps absorb choleserol, helps maintain a healthy colon, helps elliminate insulin swings by slowing the rate of sugar absorpption into the blood. Collagen aids in cell growth and maintainance, helps skin and hair strength.

Both are very good products with little or no adverse effects to the body.

the jelled property of a good stock when cooled is caused by the collagen dissolved in the liquid. The same thing happens with gellitin products such as Jello.

The jelled consitancy of jams and jellies is a function of pectin, a fruit fiber found in apple skins, and other fruits.

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Old 09-29-2005, 11:27 AM   #10
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Just a few pointers for using Agar as ICAdvisor stated ensure it's completely dissolved before you add it to milk or any other thing you want to gel.

If you don't do this you will be left with lumps in the final product and it will not be good in your mouth.

Also yes you need not place the end product in a refrigerator to set, it will set fine at room temperature.

I remember this dish that we used to make using Agar which brings back all the childhood memories. It's so simple yet so kid and for that matter adult friendly.

Use whole milk - 3 cups
Use half and half - about 1 cup
2 tsp of vanilla extract
freshly chopped fruit of your choice
Agar (one large sheet) dissolved in a little hot water
Sugar to taste

In a saucepan bring milk and half and half to a boil. Let it boil until the quantity is reduced to 3 cups. Add sugar and vanilla to it. Now slowly pour in the dissolved agar sheet. Stir it to combine.

In a square dish (9x9) or in individual ramekins spread a layer of fruit and then ladle some of the milk mixture. Let it cool completely, refrigerate until it sets, serve and enjoy the slighly creamy texture along with a burst of fruit at the bottom.
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