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Old 11-27-2008, 04:08 PM   #11
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i tried Anne's recipe, and all i have to say is, "Wow!!!"

i got the beef short ribs from Whole Foods @ $4.99 per lb.

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Originally Posted by GrillingFool View Post
I've never made short ribs. Never even really contemplated them...
Now I am interested and will have to grab some when I see them on sale.
Thanks!
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Old 11-27-2008, 04:24 PM   #12
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I agree about it probably being her version of a sofrito, although I've never heard of anyone pureeing it before.

As far as cooking the tomato paste to develop more flavor, that's called
to "pincé".
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Old 11-28-2008, 06:27 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef View Post
I agree about it probably being her version of a sofrito, although I've never heard of anyone pureeing it before.

As far as cooking the tomato paste to develop more flavor, that's called
to "pincé".
I.C., You da man! I'm sure glad you're a member of our little community around here.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the north
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Old 12-01-2008, 02:07 PM   #14
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I.C., You da man! I'm sure glad you're a member of our little community around here.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the north
That's one of those "I'll bet you didn't know that" terms. It's something you learn in culinary school from your text but no one remembers it. 99% of the professional cooks I've worked with don't know or forgot the term. Only the French guys know it LOL.
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Old 12-01-2008, 10:17 PM   #15
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It's an Italian soffritto, similar to Spanish and Latin American sofrito (note difference in spelling), except that it doesn't include tomato.
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Old 12-04-2008, 07:22 PM   #16
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she used tomato paste... does that count?

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It's an Italian soffritto, similar to Spanish and Latin American sofrito (note difference in spelling), except that it doesn't include tomato.
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Old 12-04-2008, 09:27 PM   #17
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Sorry, I missed the reference to tomato paste. With tomato paste, it is a Latin American sofrito. If you're interested, you can find a number of recipes and variantions on the internet. Sofritos are widely used in Latin American cooking.
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Old 01-05-2009, 10:55 PM   #18
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what is this called... when you puree veggies, brown them to a "crud" forms, scrape it up and allow it to form again... before deglazing? what is this process called? is it just used to form a flavor base? where can i learn more about this "technique?"
I am sorry to say that I do not agree that the above process is a sofrito (spanish) nor a soffritto (italian). In neither latin american, spanish or italian cuisine have I seen this process of pureeing veggies, then sauteeing this mixture until reduced to a "crud", scraped up and allowing to form again. The word "sofrito" in spanish comes from the verb "sofreir" which means to saute... the chopped vegetable medley (chopped by hand) when it is sauteed in oil becomes the "sofrito"... basically, it is like a sauteed "mirepoix" that contains a few other items. Now everywhere you go across latin america you could see variations added to the medley, yet in most cases the onions, garlic and tomatoes seem to always be there. And in Italian cuisine, a "soffritto" is basically the same, a "battuto" (mixture of chopped raw vegetables) that has been lightly fried/sauteed in oil. Now, particularly in Italian cuisine, this mixture is never concentrated beyond a light golden color when using onions/garlic. The browning of onions/garlic in oil that is acceptable in other cuisines is considered objectionable to the italian palate, therefore, I would never expect this to be reduced to a "crud".

So... the purpose of what they are doing is indeed developing a flavor base. But to say that this elaborate technique described above by the original poster is a sofrito/soffritto would not be accurate. I do not think there is a name/label for the technique, but I do not know for sure. But I wouldn't be quick to label it as a sofrito.
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Old 01-06-2009, 07:10 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven S View Post
I am sorry to say that I do not agree that the above process is a sofrito (spanish) nor a soffritto (italian). In neither latin american, spanish or italian cuisine have I seen this process of pureeing veggies, then sauteeing this mixture until reduced to a "crud", scraped up and allowing to form again. The word "sofrito" in spanish comes from the verb "sofreir" which means to saute... the chopped vegetable medley (chopped by hand) when it is sauteed in oil becomes the "sofrito"... basically, it is like a sauteed "mirepoix" that contains a few other items. Now everywhere you go across latin america you could see variations added to the medley, yet in most cases the onions, garlic and tomatoes seem to always be there. And in Italian cuisine, a "soffritto" is basically the same, a "battuto" (mixture of chopped raw vegetables) that has been lightly fried/sauteed in oil. Now, particularly in Italian cuisine, this mixture is never concentrated beyond a light golden color when using onions/garlic. The browning of onions/garlic in oil that is acceptable in other cuisines is considered objectionable to the italian palate, therefore, I would never expect this to be reduced to a "crud".

So... the purpose of what they are doing is indeed developing a flavor base. But to say that this elaborate technique described above by the original poster is a sofrito/soffritto would not be accurate. I do not think there is a name/label for the technique, but I do not know for sure. But I wouldn't be quick to label it as a sofrito.
Nice, informative post, Seven. However, although you may not puree the vegetables to make sofrito, it's a very common technique when you want your final sauce to be smooth, rather than chunky. I usually make my sofrito in advance and store it in small batches in the freezer to use as needed. When I do, I always puree my vegetables.

When I did a Google search, these were the first two recipes I found, both pureed:
Sofrito - Allrecipes
Basic Sofrito Recipe

As noted in both recipes, the sofrito isn't cooked until you use it. It's simply processed and frozen in its raw state.
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Old 01-06-2009, 10:42 AM   #20
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Pureeing the veggies before cooking is really not relevant to what it's called. Just think of it as very very finely chopped. The pureeing simply exposes more surface area to the pan surface and the heat so flavor extraction and caramelization are easier to achieve.
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